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dc.contributor.advisor Campbell, Lisa M.
dc.contributor.author Skilbred, Jennifer Dianne
dc.date 2006
dc.date.accessioned 2007-02-20T21:02:08Z
dc.date.available 2007-02-20T21:02:08Z
dc.date.issued 2006
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/105
dc.description.abstract Internationally shared waterbodies face a difficult set of managemment challenges, and many are being exploited at unsustainable rates. This report looks at the United Nations Environment Program’s Regional Seas program and the Large Marine Ecosystem (LME) concept, which have been developed as management tools for improving the sustainability of transboundary marine ecosystems. The Yellow Sea LME is possibly the most intensively exploited and degraded LME worldwide. Six management options were reviewed using criteria developed to discover the best path towards sustainable marine resource use. The most promising option is to combine an expanded version of the current programs with a community-based management component to ensure quicker implementation of programs and to increase community involvement. International management plans of shared areas are extremely difficult to put in place in a way that satisfies all constituents as well as meets all goals, combining the use of tools such as ecosystem and community based management may be most effective at achieving project goals. en
dc.format.extent 697587 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.subject Large marine ecosystem en
dc.subject Sustainable marine resources en
dc.subject International waterbodies en
dc.subject Community-based management en
dc.title Management Analysis of an Internationally Shared Waterbody: The Yellow Sea Large Marine Ecosystem en
dc.type Master's Project
dc.department Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences

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