Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Urban, Dean L. en_US
dc.contributor.author Sexton, Joseph O. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2009-05-01T18:30:41Z
dc.date.available 2011-07-26T04:30:04Z
dc.date.issued 2009 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/1143
dc.description Dissertation en_US
dc.description.abstract <p>An ecosystem is a community of organisms interacting with its environment, and landscapes are spatially interactive ecosystems. Earth's burgeoning human population demands ever more from finite ecosystems; but if managed well, landscapes can sustain their provision of resources and services and adapt to fulfill the changing human appetite. Management relies on sound information, and managing landscape change requires reliable spatio-temporal databases of ecologically relevant information. Remote sensing technologies fill this niche, providing increasingly large and diverse datasets, but the algorithms to extract information from the data must be developed. I developed and compared three remotely sensed measurements of forest canopy height to one another and to in situ field measurements. Both the precision and the accuracy (as well as the cost) of the measurements sorted along an axis of spatial scale, with Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) measurements proving most reliable at fine scales but prohibitively expensive over large areas and various radar technologies more appropriate for larger areas, especially when calibrated to the more accurate and precise lidar measurements. I also adapted traditional, single-time landcover classification algorithms to extract dense time series of categorical landcover maps from archival multi-spectral satellite images. These measurements greatly expand the potential spatio-temporal scope of landscape ecology and management, facilitating a shift away from data-imposed reliance on "space-for-time substitution" and loosely connected case studies toward robust, statistical analysis based on consistent information.</p> en_US
dc.format.extent 2592096 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.subject Biology, Ecology en_US
dc.subject Geography en_US
dc.subject Urban and Regional Planning en_US
dc.subject forest structure en_US
dc.subject land cover en_US
dc.subject landscape ecology en_US
dc.subject remote sensing en_US
dc.title Vertical Structure, Horizontal Cover, and Temporal Change of the North Carolina Piedmont (1985-2005) en_US
dc.type Dissertation en_US
dc.department Ecology en_US
duke.embargo.months 24 en_US

Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record