Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Kay, Richard F en_US
dc.contributor.author Mitchell, Terence Reid Townsend en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2009-05-01T18:37:22Z
dc.date.available 2011-07-26T04:30:03Z
dc.date.issued 2009 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/1218
dc.description Dissertation en_US
dc.description.abstract <p>Most vertebrates possess some overlap of the right and left visual fields. The region of overlap, the binocular field, contains unique visual cues that provide an accurate estimate of distance and three-dimensional shape. The fact that animal's might use these cues to guide behavior has several interesting implications to the study of</p><p>primate evolution. While there is an abundance of data suggesting that many animals perceive binocular cues, there is little evidence demonstrating binocular information is advantageous during ecologically relevant behaviors. </p><p>The data presented here for cats, rats, and lemurs supports the hypothesis that a loss of binocular cues alters locomotion on discontinuous substrates. The alteration in performance is interpreted as a shift to a more conservative kinematic strategy associated with an increase in uncertainty regarding the precise location of the substrate. One interpretation of this finding is that early primates would have had access to visuomotor transformations allowing them to use binocular cues to guide precise movements. As forelimbs lengthened and became more mobile, the binocular visual field also increased to help place the forelimbs on complex discontinuous substrates. While this is the most straightforward reading of my experiments on locomotion, the precise placement of long mobile forelimbs is likely to be important in a wide range of circumstances. The role of forward facing eyes in primate origins remains one of the most intriguing questions in physical anthropology.</p> en_US
dc.format.extent 2430845 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.subject Anthropology, Physical en_US
dc.subject Biology, Zoology en_US
dc.subject Biology, Ecology en_US
dc.subject binocular en_US
dc.subject grasping en_US
dc.subject kinematics en_US
dc.subject locomotion en_US
dc.subject primate en_US
dc.subject reaching en_US
dc.title The Role of Binocular Vision in Mammalian Locomotion en_US
dc.type Dissertation en_US
dc.department Evolutionary Anthropology en_US
duke.embargo.months 24 en_US

Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record