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dc.contributor.advisor Dowell, Earl H en_US
dc.contributor.advisor Hall, Kenneth C en_US
dc.contributor.author Conyers, Howard J. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2009-08-27T18:21:24Z
dc.date.available 2011-08-27T04:30:07Z
dc.date.issued 2009 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/1298
dc.description Dissertation en_US
dc.description.abstract <p>Theoretical and experimental studies are conducted in the field of aeroelasticity. Specifically, two rectangular and one cropped delta wings with a hole are analyzed in this dissertation for their aeroelastic behavior.</p><p>The plate-like wings are modeled using the finite element method for the structural theory. Each wing is assumed to behave as a linearly elastic and isotropic, thin plate. These assumptions are those of small-deflection theory of bending which states that the plane sections initially normal to the midsurface remain plane and normal to that surface after bending. The wings are modeled in low speed flows according to potential flow theory. The potential flow is governed by the aerodynamic potential equation, a linear partial differential equation. The aerodynamic potential equation is solved using a distribution of doublets that relates pressure to downwash in the doublet lattice method. A hole in a wing-like structure is independently investigated theoretically and experimentally for its structural and aerodynamic behavior.</p><p>The aeroelastic model couples the structural and aerodynamic models using Lagrange's equations. The flutter boundary is predicted using the V-g method. Linear theoretical models are capable of predicting the critical flutter velocity and frequency as verified by wind tunnel tests. Along with flutter prediction, a brief survey on gust response and the addition of stores(missile or fuel tanks) are examined.</p> en_US
dc.format.extent 2973843 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.subject Engineering, Mechanical en_US
dc.subject damaged wings en_US
dc.subject doublet lattice method en_US
dc.subject finite element method en_US
dc.subject flutter en_US
dc.subject wind tunnel experiments en_US
dc.title The Effect of Wing Damage on Aeroelastic Behavior en_US
dc.type Dissertation en_US
dc.department Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science en_US
duke.embargo.months 24 en_US

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