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dc.contributor.advisor Meintjes, Louise en_US
dc.contributor.author Woodruff, Jennifer Ann en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2009-12-18T16:24:43Z
dc.date.available 2009-12-18T16:24:43Z
dc.date.issued 2009 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/1585
dc.description Dissertation en_US
dc.description.abstract <p>This dissertation documents African-American girls' musical practices at a Boys and Girls Club in Durham, NC. Hip-hop is the cornerstone of social exchanges at John Avery, and is integrated into virtually all club activities. Detractors point to the misogyny, sexual exploitation and violence predominant in hip-hop's most popular incarnations, suggesting that the music is a corrupting influence on America's youth. Girls are familiar with these arguments, and they appreciate that hip-hop is a contested and sometimes illicit terrain. Yet they also recognize that knowledge about and participation in hip-hop-related activities is crucial to their interactions at the club, at school, and at home. As girls hone their listening skills, they reconcile the contradictions between behavior glorified by hip-hop and the model presented to them by their mentors. This project examines how African-American girls ages 5-13 use their listening practices to claim a space within hip-hop's landscape while still operating within the unambiguous moral framework they have learned from their parents, mentors and peers. Through ethnography and close analysis of vocal utterances, dance moves and social interaction, I consider how individual interactions with mass-mediated music teach girls a black musical aesthetic that allows them to relate to their peers and mentors, and how these interactions highlight the creativity with which they begin to negotiate sexual and racial politics on the margins of society.</p> en_US
dc.format.extent 1350623 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.subject Music en_US
dc.subject Black Studies en_US
dc.subject Anthropology, Cultural en_US
dc.subject girls en_US
dc.subject hip en_US
dc.subject hop en_US
dc.subject identity en_US
dc.subject listening en_US
dc.subject morality en_US
dc.subject performance en_US
dc.title Learning to Listen, Learning to Be: African-American Girls and Hip-Hop at a Durham, NC Boys and Girls Club en_US
dc.type Dissertation en_US
dc.department Music en_US

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