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dc.contributor.author Khwaja, A
dc.contributor.author Silverman, D
dc.contributor.author Sloan, F
dc.contributor.author Wang, Y
dc.coverage.spatial Netherlands
dc.date.accessioned 2010-03-09T15:32:50Z
dc.date.issued 2009-03
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19178971
dc.identifier S0167-6296(08)00197-5
dc.identifier.citation J Health Econ, 2009, 28 (2), pp. 385 - 397
dc.identifier.issn 0167-6296
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/1948
dc.description.abstract While there are many reasons to continue to smoke in spite of its consequences for health, the concern that many smoke because they misperceive the risks of smoking remains a focus of public discussion and motivates tobacco control policies and litigation. In this paper we investigate the relative accuracy of mature smokers' risk perceptions about future survival, and a range of morbidities and disabilities. Using data from the survey on smoking (SOS) conducted for this research, we compare subjective beliefs elicited from the SOS with corresponding individual-specific objective probabilities estimated from the health and retirement study. Overall, consumers in the age group studied, 50-70, are not overly optimistic in their perceptions of health risk. If anything, smokers tend to be relatively pessimistic about these risks. The finding that smokers are either well informed or pessimistic regarding a broad range of health risks suggests that these beliefs are not pivotal in the decision to continue smoking. Although statements by the tobacco companies may have been misleading and thus encouraged some to start smoking, we find no evidence that systematic misinformation about the health consequences of smoking inhibits quitting.
dc.format.extent 385 - 397
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language eng
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.relation.ispartof J Health Econ
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2008.12.004
dc.subject Aged
dc.subject Deception
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
dc.subject Health Surveys
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Middle Aged
dc.subject Risk Assessment
dc.subject Smoking
dc.subject United States
dc.title Are mature smokers misinformed?
dc.type Journal Article
dc.department Economics
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19178971
pubs.issue 2
pubs.organisational-group /Duke
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Institutes and Provost's Academic Units/University Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Institutes and Provost's Academic Units/University Institutes and Centers/Global Health Institute
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Sanford School of Public Policy
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Sanford School of Public Policy/Center for Child and Family Policy
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Sanford School of Public Policy/Duke Population Research Institute
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Sanford School of Public Policy/Duke Population Research Institute/Center for Population Health & Aging
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Sanford School of Public Policy/Duke Population Research Institute/Duke Population Research Center
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/School of Nursing
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/School of Nursing/School of Nursing - Secondary Group
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Trinity College of Arts & Sciences/Economics
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Trinity College of Arts & Sciences/Institute of Public Policy
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Trinity College of Arts & Sciences/Institute of Public Policy/Public Policy Studies
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 28

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