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dc.contributor.advisor Crowder, Larry
dc.contributor.author Bowers, Matthew
dc.date.accessioned 2010-04-29T20:33:16Z
dc.date.available 2010-04-29T20:33:16Z
dc.date.issued 2010-04-29T20:33:16Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/2177
dc.description.abstract In 2007, the newest report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPPC) stated that warming of the global climate system is now occurring at an unprecedented rate. Scientists have observed significant temperature changes in both the air and ocean, and predict that there is more warming yet to come. Sea turtles may be sensitive to global warming due to two features of their life history: temperature dependent sex determination (TSD), and high nesting site fidelity. With TSD the temperature of incubation determines the sex of the hatchlings with high temperatures yielding females and low temperatures yielding males. Local temperature shifts in turtle-nesting regions may affect the gender balance of one or several sea turtle species. Sea turtles might prevent sex skewing by nesting earlier in the season. I looked for a temporal response to climate change in loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) by conducting multi-level regression analysis on first nesting dates from ninety beaches in the Southeast United States over a 30-year period. Loggerhead sea turtles arrived 0.2 days earlier every year over this period, 1.4 days earlier for every point increase in the NAO index, and 3.6 days later for every degree increase in latitude. These results suggest that loggerheads are capable of a behavioral response to climate variability and appear to be responding to long-term trends. en_US
dc.format.extent 2622088 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.subject phenology en_US
dc.subject loggerhead en_US
dc.subject Climate change en_US
dc.subject nao en_US
dc.subject habitat en_US
dc.subject sex skews en_US
dc.title Phenological Shifts in Loggerhead Sea Turlte Nesting Dates en_US
dc.type Masters' project
dc.department Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences

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