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dc.contributor.advisor Johnson, Timothy
dc.contributor.author McNamara, Patrick
dc.date.accessioned 2010-04-30T20:31:58Z
dc.date.available 2010-04-30T20:31:58Z
dc.date.issued 2010-04-30T20:31:58Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/2231
dc.description.abstract Algae have long been researched as a potential source of biodiesel and biofuel because of their quick growth rate, simple inputs and ability to grow under environments unsuitable for many other plants. Using a Monte Carlo simulation, this analysis examines the circumstances under which an algae farm might become profitable now and in the future. The use of CO2 from fossil fuels, specifically coal-fired power plants, is potentially valuable for both the utility and the algae farm because algae require large amounts of CO2 for their high growth rates. My results show that the success of algae farms in the United States is currently unprofitable in the short and mid-term (five to ten years). Moreover their long term profitability is heavily dependent on the system design, fuel prices, location, the existence and increase of prices being placed on air pollutants such as CO2 and NOX, as well as successive scientific breakthroughs under reasonable assumptions. en_US
dc.format.extent 123002 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/msword
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.subject Algae en_US
dc.subject Coal en_US
dc.subject Renewable energy en_US
dc.subject Biofuel en_US
dc.subject Biodiesel en_US
dc.subject Monte Carlo en_US
dc.title Algae and Coal: Turning Pollution Into Prosperity en_US
dc.type Masters' project
dc.department Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences

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