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dc.contributor.advisor Rubin, David C en_US
dc.contributor.advisor Cabeza, Roberto E en_US
dc.contributor.author Cabeza, R
dc.contributor.author St Jacques, P
dc.coverage.spatial England
dc.date.accessioned 2010-05-10T20:17:10Z
dc.date.issued 2007-05
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17382578
dc.identifier S1364-6613(07)00078-2
dc.identifier.citation Trends Cogn Sci, 2007, 11 (5), pp. 219 - 227
dc.identifier.issn 1364-6613
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/2445
dc.description Dissertation en_US
dc.description.abstract Functional neuroimaging studies of autobiographical memory have grown dramatically in recent years. These studies are important because they can investigate the neural correlates of processes that are difficult to study using laboratory stimuli, including: (i) complex constructive processes, (ii) recollective qualities of emotion and vividness, and (iii) remote memory retrieval. Constructing autobiographical memories involves search, monitoring and self-referential processes that are associated with activity in separable prefrontal regions. The contributions of emotion and vividness have been linked to the amygdala and visual cortex respectively. Finally, there is evidence that recent and remote autobiographical memories might activate the hippocampus equally, which has implications for memory-consolidation theories. The rapid development of innovative methods for eliciting personal memories in the scanner provides the opportunity to delve into the functional neuroanatomy of our personal past.
dc.format.extent 219 - 227
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language eng
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.relation.ispartof Trends Cogn Sci
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1016/j.tics.2007.02.005
dc.subject Amygdala
dc.subject Autobiography as Topic
dc.subject Hippocampus
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Magnetic Resonance Imaging
dc.subject Memory
dc.title Functional neuroimaging of autobiographical memory.
dc.type Journal Article
dc.department Psychology and Neuroscience en_US
duke.embargo.months 24 en_US
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17382578
pubs.issue 5
pubs.organisational-group /Duke
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Institutes and Provost's Academic Units/Initiatives
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Institutes and Provost's Academic Units/Initiatives/Duke Science & Society
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Institutes and Provost's Academic Units/University Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Institutes and Provost's Academic Units/University Institutes and Centers/Duke Institute for Brain Sciences
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Institutes and Provost's Academic Units/University Institutes and Centers/Duke Institute for Brain Sciences/Center for Cognitive Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Sanford School of Public Policy
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Sanford School of Public Policy/Duke Population Research Institute
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Sanford School of Public Policy/Duke Population Research Institute/Center for Population Health & Aging
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/School of Medicine/Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/School of Medicine/Clinical Science Departments/Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/School of Medicine/Clinical Science Departments/Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Geriatric Behavioral Health
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/School of Medicine/Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/School of Medicine/Institutes and Centers/Duke-UNC Center for Brain Imaging and Analysis
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Trinity College of Arts & Sciences/Psychology and Neuroscience
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 11

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