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dc.contributor.author Hoover, Dr Kevin en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-06-28T18:50:12Z
dc.date.available 2010-06-28T18:50:12Z
dc.date.issued 1995 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/2558
dc.description.abstract The reputation of John Maynard Keynes’s General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money as a badly written book is often exaggerated. But if it is deserved at all, it is because of parts such as chapter 2, “The Postulates of the Classical Economy.” Half a century of exegesis and interpretation have yet to provide a satisfactory and widely accepted version of what this chapter really means. Reactions to chapter 2 fall into four main strands. en_US
dc.format.extent 2043568 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher History of Political Economy en_US
dc.subject interwar macroeconomics en_US
dc.subject investment fluctuations en_US
dc.subject macroeconomics en_US
dc.subject postwar monetary economics en_US
dc.subject world war II en_US
dc.title Relative Wages, Rationality, and Involuntary Unemployment in Keynes's Labor Market en_US
dc.type Journal Article en_US
dc.department Economics

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