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dc.contributor.author Alley, Randall D.
dc.date.accessioned 2010-07-20T16:22:12Z
dc.date.available 2010-07-20T16:22:12Z
dc.date.issued 2002
dc.identifier.citation MEC '02 : the next generation : University of New Brunswick's Myoelectric Controls/Powered Prosthetics Symposium, Fredericton, N.B., Canada, August 21-23, 2002 : conference proceedings. en_US
dc.identifier.isbn 1551310295 9781551310299
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/2684
dc.description.abstract Although traditional upper extremity prosthetic interface and frame (collectively referred to here as “interface”) designs have enabled many individuals to integrate prostheses into their rehabilitation plan, the biomechanical attributes and other parameters of these designs have not been significantly reviewed and improved upon until recently. In the last decade, a multitude of design innovations have been incorporated, which have resulted in wearers reporting superior comfort, suspension, stability, and range of motion, among other advantages. In most cases, when paired with a variety of control systems, the new designs appear to be inherently more efficient in terms of force transmission and motion capture, and more functionally consistent than traditional types of “sockets”. It is the intention of this paper to highlight these novel design elements, as well as to discuss the biomechanical principles involved, to enable prosthetic users and other individuals to better understand these advanced interfaces. en_US
dc.format.extent 163035 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Myoelectric Symposium en_US
dc.subject Upper Limb Prostheses en_US
dc.subject Upper extremity prosthetics en_US
dc.title ADVANCEMENT OF UPPER EXTREMITY PROSTHETIC INTERFACE AND FRAME DESIGN en_US
dc.type Article en_US

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