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dc.contributor.author Mandacina, Stephen
dc.contributor.author Farnsworth, Troy
dc.date.accessioned 2010-07-20T16:36:08Z
dc.date.available 2010-07-20T16:36:08Z
dc.date.issued 2002
dc.identifier.citation MEC '02 : the next generation : University of New Brunswick's Myoelectric Controls/Powered Prosthetics Symposium, Fredericton, N.B., Canada, August 21-23, 2002 : conference proceedings. en_US
dc.identifier.isbn 1551310295 9781551310299
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/2688
dc.description.abstract Cerebral Palsy affects 15-20 new borns in every 10,000. Currently, near a half million people in the U.S. are effected with C.P. Diagnosing the condition is done clinically, with lab test only ruling out other diseases. The tests performed, such as manual muscle testing, ROM, physical and emotional development, are all compared to normal childhood outcomes. Therefore, many infants are not diagnosed with C.P. until the age of two or three. Symptoms are normally weak or tight muscles, poor balance and gait, along with seizures in approximately half of the effected people. Over time, weak muscles can often develop severe joint contractures, classified as spastic Cerebral Palsy en_US
dc.format.extent 81863 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Myoelectric Symposium en_US
dc.subject electric prosthesis en_US
dc.subject cerebral palsy en_US
dc.title ELECTIVE AMPUTATION OF CEREBRAL PALSY PATIENT SUCCESSFULLY WEARS ELECTRIC PROSTHESIS en_US
dc.type Article en_US

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