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dc.contributor.author Harris, Melanie S.
dc.contributor.author Esparza, Waldo O.
dc.date.accessioned 2010-07-28T19:38:09Z
dc.date.available 2010-07-28T19:38:09Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.citation Proceedings of the MEC’08 conference, UNB; 2008. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/2785
dc.description.abstract This pilot study is to investigate alternatives to existing harness/skin interface for upper extremity amputees who use conventional or myoelectric prostheses with a harness. The study design is a single-system prospective study utilizing a population of convenience. A clinic population of upper limb amputees (trans-humeral, trans-radial and trans-carpal) from Tampa Bay Prosthetics and one associated with Northwestern University were included in the study. Participants were provided with two Jockey® Next-to-Nothing™ undershirts to wear as an interface between their harness and skin. They were asked to evaluate the new interface in comparison to their existing wearing pattern. Data for the study was collected using a selfreporting questionnaire that would be filled out after a predetermined wearing schedule. All of the participants were full-time upper extremity prosthetic users. Overall, results from the questionnaire indicates that the new textiles can positively impact the use of a harness in upper extremity prosthetic wearers en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Myoelectric Symposium en_US
dc.subject undershirt fabric en_US
dc.title This pilot study is to investigate alternatives to existing harness/skin interface for upper extremity amputees who use conventional or myoelectric prostheses with a harness. The study design is a single-system prospective study utilizing a population of convenience. A clinic population of upper limb amputees (trans-humeral, trans-radial and trans-carpal) from Tampa Bay Prosthetics and one associated with Northwestern University were included in the study. Participants were provided with two Jockey® Next-to-Nothing™ undershirts to wear as an interface between their harness and skin. They were asked to evaluate the new interface in comparison to their existing wearing pattern. Data for the study was collected using a selfreporting questionnaire that would be filled out after a predetermined wearing schedule. All of the participants were full-time upper extremity prosthetic users. Overall, results from the questionnaire indicates that the new textiles can positively impact the use of a harness in upper extremity prosthetic wearers en_US
dc.type Article en_US

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