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dc.contributor.author Williams, T. Walley, III
dc.date.accessioned 2010-08-03T16:49:01Z
dc.date.available 2010-08-03T16:49:01Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.citation Proceedings of the MEC’08 conference, UNB; 2008. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/2823
dc.description.abstract In conventional myoelectric control, muscles are assigned to control functions differing from those controlled in the intact limb. In 1984 a bilateral amputee was fitted with four myoelectric inputs around the shoulder. These were to be used in pairs to independently control operation of the gripper and elbow flexion-extension. Since none of the muscles were doing their original assignment, a program was set up to train the user on the system. After many sessions, the amputee and trainer agreed that simultaneous control was never going to work. The control system was reconfigured, and the user mastered controlling one device at a time sequentially with the two best control sites. Twenty years later people are again trying to control several devices simultaneously, but with a difference. Now, with targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) each muscle is being used to control the same function as in the intact limb. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Myoelectric Symposium en_US
dc.subject Amputees en_US
dc.subject digital arm en_US
dc.title ADAPTING THE BOSTON DIGITAL ARM TO ACCEPT FIVE INDEPENDENT INPUTS FROM TMR AMPUTEES en_US
dc.type Article en_US

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