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dc.contributor.advisor Bennear, Lori Snyder
dc.contributor.author Austin, Roger
dc.date.accessioned 2007-06-27T17:43:52Z
dc.date.available 2007-06-27T17:43:52Z
dc.date.issued 2007-05
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/336
dc.description.abstract Previous empirical work suggests that poor firm environmental performance is negatively associated with firm financial performance. A common measure of firm environmental performance is emissions of toxic chemicals, typically taken from the EPA’s Toxic Release Inventory (TRI). However, TRI emissions do not accurately represent the actual health risks posed by these emissions as they do not take into account factors such as chemical toxicity and exposure. Therefore, the relationship between risk-adjusted emissions and firm financial performance is unknown. To explore this issue and others, this paper analyzes 148 US manufacturing firms over the time period 2000 – 2003. Once I control for time-consistent firm-level features, I find evidence of a negative association between risk-adjusted emissions and firm financial performance across a variety of specifications. More generally, I provide consistent statistical evidence that environmental performance does impact firm financial performance. en
dc.format.extent 396181 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.subject Environmental performance en
dc.subject Financial performance en
dc.subject Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) en
dc.subject Economics en
dc.title Green to Gold? An Empirical Study of the Relationship between Firm Environmental and Financial Performance en
dc.type Masters' Project
dc.department Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences

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