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dc.contributor.advisor Thomas, Duncan en_US
dc.contributor.author Mavunga, Ernest Shungu en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-05-20T19:13:02Z
dc.date.available 2013-05-08T04:30:05Z
dc.date.issued 2010 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/3773
dc.description Thesis en_US
dc.description.abstract <p>This study was conducted using data that was collected as part of the National Income Dynamic Study(NIDS). We hypothesized that in the NIDS study conducted in South Africa this phenomenon would be observed as a rise in the first blood pressure and a drop to normal on the second reading. We then set out to investigate whether this phenomenon would be more pronounced among those with limited access to medical services such as those in the rural areas, those from low-income homes, the population with little or no education and lastly the black or colored population. Our analysis revealed that the white coat effect did indeed exist significantly among black races and the colored race but was not dependent on sex, education level, or income level. Based on the inaccuracies that come from the white coat effect and the resulting preference for home or ambulatory blood pressure readings we then set out to investigate whether those with home blood pressure monitors would have better blood pressure control than those individuals without home blood pressure monitors. This investigation was carried out in Zimbabwe for 10 weeks and will go on for a year. From the 10week results, it would seem those individuals with home blood pressure monitors achieved better blood pressure control than individuals without home blood pressure monitors. It seems this was a function of a higher number of clinic visits that were made by those with home blood pressure monitors compared to individuals who did not have home blood pressure monitors.</p> en_US
dc.subject Health Sciences en_US
dc.subject Blood pressure en_US
dc.subject Hypertension en_US
dc.subject NIDS en_US
dc.subject South Africa en_US
dc.subject Zimbabwe en_US
dc.title Hypertension Analysis from the National Income Dynamics Survey-South Africa Field Work in Zimbabwe Investigating the usefulness of Home Blood Pressure Monitors to Control Hypertension en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.department Global Health en_US
duke.embargo.months 24 en_US

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