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dc.contributor.author Little, MG
dc.contributor.author Jackson, RB
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-21T17:25:54Z
dc.date.issued 2010-12-01
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20977267
dc.identifier.citation Environ Sci Technol, 2010, 44 (23), pp. 9225 - 9232
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/4027
dc.description.abstract Carbon Capture and Storage may use deep saline aquifers for CO(2) sequestration, but small CO(2) leakage could pose a risk to overlying fresh groundwater. We performed laboratory incubations of CO(2) infiltration under oxidizing conditions for >300 days on samples from four freshwater aquifers to 1) understand how CO(2) leakage affects freshwater quality; 2) develop selection criteria for deep sequestration sites based on inorganic metal contamination caused by CO(2) leaks to shallow aquifers; and 3) identify geochemical signatures for early detection criteria. After exposure to CO(2), water pH declines of 1-2 units were apparent in all aquifer samples. CO(2) caused concentrations of the alkali and alkaline earths and manganese, cobalt, nickel, and iron to increase by more than 2 orders of magnitude. Potentially dangerous uranium and barium increased throughout the entire experiment in some samples. Solid-phase metal mobility, carbonate buffering capacity, and redox state in the shallow overlying aquifers influence the impact of CO(2) leakage and should be considered when selecting deep geosequestration sites. Manganese, iron, calcium, and pH could be used as geochemical markers of a CO(2) leak, as their concentrations increase within 2 weeks of exposure to CO(2).
dc.format.extent 9225 - 9232
dc.language ENG
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.relation.ispartof Environ Sci Technol
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1021/es102235w
dc.subject Calcium
dc.subject Carbon
dc.subject Carbon Dioxide
dc.subject Carbon Sequestration
dc.subject Carbonates
dc.subject Environment
dc.subject Environmental Monitoring
dc.subject Environmental Restoration and Remediation
dc.subject Fresh Water
dc.subject Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
dc.subject Iron
dc.subject Manganese
dc.subject Oxidation-Reduction
dc.subject Water Pollutants, Chemical
dc.title Potential impacts of leakage from deep CO2 geosequestration on overlying freshwater aquifers.
dc.title.alternative en_US
dc.type Journal Article
dc.description.version Version of Record en_US
duke.date.pubdate 2010-12-1 en_US
duke.description.endpage 9232 en_US
duke.description.issue 23 en_US
duke.description.startpage 9225 en_US
duke.description.volume 44 en_US
dc.relation.journal Environmental science & technology en_US
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20977267
pubs.issue 23
pubs.organisational-group /Duke
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Nicholas School of the Environment
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Nicholas School of the Environment/Earth and Ocean Sciences
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 44
dc.identifier.eissn 1520-5851

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