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dc.contributor.author Todi, SV
dc.contributor.author Sivan-Loukianova, E
dc.contributor.author Jacobs, JS
dc.contributor.author Kiehart, DP
dc.contributor.author Eberl, DF
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-21T17:31:23Z
dc.date.issued 2008-05-07
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18461180
dc.identifier.citation PLoS One, 2008, 3 (5), pp. e2115 - ?
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/4491
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: Myosin VIIA (MyoVIIA) is an unconventional myosin necessary for vertebrate audition [1]-[5]. Human auditory transduction occurs in sensory hair cells with a staircase-like arrangement of apical protrusions called stereocilia. In these hair cells, MyoVIIA maintains stereocilia organization [6]. Severe mutations in the Drosophila MyoVIIA orthologue, crinkled (ck), are semi-lethal [7] and lead to deafness by disrupting antennal auditory organ (Johnston's Organ, JO) organization [8]. ck/MyoVIIA mutations result in apical detachment of auditory transduction units (scolopidia) from the cuticle that transmits antennal vibrations as mechanical stimuli to JO. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using flies expressing GFP-tagged NompA, a protein required for auditory organ organization in Drosophila, we examined the role of ck/MyoVIIA in JO development and maintenance through confocal microscopy and extracellular electrophysiology. Here we show that ck/MyoVIIA is necessary early in the developing antenna for initial apical attachment of the scolopidia to the articulating joint. ck/MyoVIIA is also necessary to maintain scolopidial attachment throughout adulthood. Moreover, in the adult JO, ck/MyoVIIA genetically interacts with the non-muscle myosin II (through its regulatory light chain protein and the myosin binding subunit of myosin II phosphatase). Such genetic interactions have not previously been observed in scolopidia. These factors are therefore candidates for modulating MyoVIIA activity in vertebrates. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that MyoVIIA plays evolutionarily conserved roles in auditory organ development and maintenance in invertebrates and vertebrates, enhancing our understanding of auditory organ development and function, as well as providing significant clues for future research.
dc.format.extent e2115 - ?
dc.language eng
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.relation.ispartof PLoS One
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1371/journal.pone.0002115
dc.subject Animals
dc.subject Auditory Perception
dc.subject Conserved Sequence
dc.subject Drosophila
dc.subject Drosophila Proteins
dc.subject Dyneins
dc.subject Evolution, Molecular
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Mutation
dc.subject Myosins
dc.subject Sensory Receptor Cells
dc.title Myosin VIIA, important for human auditory function, is necessary for Drosophila auditory organ development.
dc.title.alternative en_US
dc.type Journal Article
dc.description.version Version of Record en_US
duke.date.pubdate 2008-5-7 en_US
duke.description.endpage e2115 en_US
duke.description.issue 5 en_US
duke.description.startpage e2115 en_US
duke.description.volume 3 en_US
dc.relation.journal Plos One en_US
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18461180
pubs.issue 5
pubs.organisational-group /Duke
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Institutes and Provost's Academic Units/Initiatives
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Institutes and Provost's Academic Units/Initiatives/Duke Science & Society
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/School of Medicine/Basic Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/School of Medicine/Basic Science Departments/Cell Biology
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Trinity College of Arts & Sciences/Biology
pubs.publication-status Published online
pubs.volume 3
dc.identifier.eissn 1932-6203

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