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dc.contributor.author Weisrock, DW
dc.contributor.author Rasoloarison, RM
dc.contributor.author Fiorentino, I
dc.contributor.author Ralison, JM
dc.contributor.author Goodman, SM
dc.contributor.author Kappeler, PM
dc.contributor.author Yoder, AD
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-21T17:31:30Z
dc.date.issued 2010-03-31
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20360988
dc.identifier.citation PLoS One, 2010, 5 (3), pp. e9883 - ?
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/4534
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: Speciation begins when populations become genetically separated through a substantial reduction in gene flow, and it is at this point that a genetically cohesive set of populations attain the sole property of species: the independent evolution of a population-level lineage. The comprehensive delimitation of species within biodiversity hotspots, regardless of their level of divergence, is important for understanding the factors that drive the diversification of biota and for identifying them as targets for conservation. However, delimiting recently diverged species is challenging due to insufficient time for the differential evolution of characters--including morphological differences, reproductive isolation, and gene tree monophyly--that are typically used as evidence for separately evolving lineages. METHODOLOGY: In this study, we assembled multiple lines of evidence from the analysis of mtDNA and nDNA sequence data for the delimitation of a high diversity of cryptically diverged population-level mouse lemur lineages across the island of Madagascar. Our study uses a multi-faceted approach that applies phylogenetic, population genetic, and genealogical analysis for recognizing lineage diversity and presents the most thoroughly sampled species delimitation of mouse lemur ever performed. CONCLUSIONS: The resolution of a large number of geographically defined clades in the mtDNA gene tree provides strong initial evidence for recognizing a high diversity of population-level lineages in mouse lemurs. We find additional support for lineage recognition in the striking concordance between mtDNA clades and patterns of nuclear population structure. Lineages identified using these two sources of evidence also exhibit patterns of population divergence according to genealogical exclusivity estimates. Mouse lemur lineage diversity is reflected in both a geographically fine-scaled pattern of population divergence within established and geographically widespread taxa, as well as newly resolved patterns of micro-endemism revealed through expanded field sampling into previously poorly and well-sampled regions.
dc.format.extent e9883 - ?
dc.language ENG
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.relation.ispartof PLoS One
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1371/journal.pone.0009883
dc.subject Animals
dc.subject Bayes Theorem
dc.subject Biodiversity
dc.subject Biological Evolution
dc.subject Cell Nucleus
dc.subject Cheirogaleidae
dc.subject DNA
dc.subject DNA, Mitochondrial
dc.subject Evolution, Molecular
dc.subject Genetic Speciation
dc.subject Genetics, Population
dc.subject Geography
dc.subject Madagascar
dc.subject Phylogeny
dc.subject Polymerase Chain Reaction
dc.subject Species Specificity
dc.title Delimiting species without nuclear monophyly in Madagascar's mouse lemurs.
dc.title.alternative en_US
dc.type Journal Article
dc.description.version Version of Record en_US
duke.date.pubdate 2010-3-31 en_US
duke.description.endpage e9883 en_US
duke.description.issue 3 en_US
duke.description.startpage e9883 en_US
duke.description.volume 5 en_US
dc.relation.journal Plos One en_US
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20360988
pubs.issue 3
pubs.organisational-group /Duke
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Institutes and Provost's Academic Units/Initiatives
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Institutes and Provost's Academic Units/Initiatives/Duke Science & Society
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Institutes and Provost's Academic Units/University Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Institutes and Provost's Academic Units/University Institutes and Centers/Duke Institute for Brain Sciences
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Sanford School of Public Policy
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Sanford School of Public Policy/Duke Population Research Institute
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Sanford School of Public Policy/Duke Population Research Institute/Center for Population Health & Aging
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Trinity College of Arts & Sciences/Biology
pubs.publication-status Published online
pubs.volume 5
dc.identifier.eissn 1932-6203

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