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dc.contributor.author Sato, Y
dc.contributor.author Sogabe, Y
dc.contributor.author Mazuka, R
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-21T17:32:25Z
dc.date.issued 2010-11
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19925204
dc.identifier.citation J Cogn Neurosci, 2010, 22 (11), pp. 2503 - 2513
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/4622
dc.description.abstract Infants' speech perception abilities change through the first year of life, from broad sensitivity to a wide range of speech contrasts to becoming more finely attuned to their native language. What remains unclear, however, is how this perceptual change relates to brain responses to native language contrasts in terms of the functional specialization of the left and right hemispheres. Here, to elucidate the developmental changes in functional lateralization accompanying this perceptual change, we conducted two experiments on Japanese infants using Japanese lexical pitch-accent, which changes word meanings with the pitch pattern within words. In the first behavioral experiment, using visual habituation, we confirmed that infants at both 4 and 10 months have sensitivities to the lexical pitch-accent pattern change embedded in disyllabic words. In the second experiment, near-infrared spectroscopy was used to measure cortical hemodynamic responses in the left and right hemispheres to the same lexical pitch-accent pattern changes and their pure tone counterparts. We found that brain responses to the pitch change within words differed between 4- and 10-month-old infants in terms of functional lateralization: Left hemisphere dominance for the perception of the pitch change embedded in words was seen only in the 10-month-olds. These results suggest that the perceptual change in Japanese lexical pitch-accent may be related to a shift in functional lateralization from bilateral to left hemisphere dominance.
dc.format.extent 2503 - 2513
dc.language eng
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.relation.ispartof J Cogn Neurosci
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1162/jocn.2009.21377
dc.subject Acoustic Stimulation
dc.subject Age Factors
dc.subject Analysis of Variance
dc.subject Asian Continental Ancestry Group
dc.subject Brain Mapping
dc.subject Cerebral Cortex
dc.subject Dominance, Cerebral
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Hemoglobins
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Infant
dc.subject Language
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Pitch Perception
dc.subject Reaction Time
dc.subject Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared
dc.subject Time Factors
dc.title Development of hemispheric specialization for lexical pitch-accent in Japanese infants.
dc.title.alternative en_US
dc.type Journal Article
dc.description.version Version of Record en_US
duke.date.pubdate 2010-11-0 en_US
duke.description.endpage 2513 en_US
duke.description.issue 11 en_US
duke.description.startpage 2503 en_US
duke.description.volume 22 en_US
dc.relation.journal Journal of cognitive neuroscience en_US
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19925204
pubs.issue 11
pubs.organisational-group /Duke
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Trinity College of Arts & Sciences/Psychology and Neuroscience
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 22
dc.identifier.eissn 1530-8898

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