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dc.contributor.advisor McShea, Daniel W en_US
dc.contributor.author Fleming, Leonore en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-01-12T13:38:29Z
dc.date.available 2014-01-01T05:30:06Z
dc.date.issued 2011 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/5065
dc.description Thesis en_US
dc.description.abstract <p>The Zero Force Evolutionary Law predicts an increase in complexity at all levels of biological hierarchy unless there are constraints or selective forces opposing that increase. I present the first test of this universal tendency by evaluating the complexity of <italic>Drosophila melanogaster</italic> mutants, which represent organisms that arise in a context where selective forces are greatly reduced. Complexity gains and losses were measured with respect to part types, shape and color over two independent focal levels. My results show, significantly, that <italic>D. melanogaster</italic> mutants are more complex than the wild type. I also find that among mutants, those that are weakly constrained are more complex with respect to part types, shape and color. These findings are the first step in testing whether the Zero Force Evolutionary Law is true, and provide the impetus for a larger research program devoted to understanding increases in complexity as the default expectation.</p> en_US
dc.subject Biology en_US
dc.subject Evolution & development en_US
dc.subject Philosophy of science en_US
dc.title The Greater Complexity of Drosophila Mutants as Compared to the Wild Type: Part-­type, Shape and Color Complexity Over Two Focal Levels en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.department Biology en_US
duke.embargo.months 24 en_US

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