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dc.contributor.author Staddon, John E.R.
dc.date.accessioned 2012-03-22T14:46:53Z
dc.date.available 2012-03-22T14:46:53Z
dc.date.issued 2006
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/5119
dc.description.abstract The Darwinian metaphor, to which Skinner was an early contributor, has been a commonplace for several years. Operant learning is seen as an interplay between response emission (variation) and reinforcement (selection). In applying his ideas to teaching, Skinner emphasized selection almost exclusively. But the real puzzle posed by non-rote learning, in both animals and humans, is not selection but the sources of variation that cause an action or an idea to appear for the first time. It is in this sense that Skinner’s whole discussion of teaching may have missed the point. en_US
dc.publisher International Journal of Psychology en_US
dc.subject teaching, learning, dog,school.selection, darwin en_US
dc.title Did Skinner Miss the Point about Teaching? en_US
dc.type Article en_US
duke.description.endpage 558 en_US
duke.description.issue 6 en_US
duke.description.startpage 555 en_US
duke.description.volume 41 en_US

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