Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Anderson, Scott
dc.date.accessioned 2012-03-29T12:31:06Z
dc.date.available 2012-03-29T12:31:06Z
dc.date.issued 2011-12
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/5121
dc.description Honors Thesis en_US
dc.description.abstract From 2002 to 2006, Cobb County, Georgia placed controversial stickers on high school biology textbooks which were critical of evolution. This study uses the differences-in-differences method to analyze what effects the sticker policy had on biology student test performance. Data collected from 2003 to 2010 suggest that the removal of the stickers in 2006 resulted in both a higher failure rate and a lower rate of pass plus scores in Cobb County schools. However, these results suggest that any effect the stickers had on student performance was minimal. This study concludes that students learn better when the material being learned relates to events outside of the classroom and are seen by students as controversial. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Creationism en_US
dc.subject Evolution en_US
dc.subject Cobb County en_US
dc.subject Science Curriculum en_US
dc.title Scoring Evolution and Creationism en_US
dc.department Public Policy Studies en_US

Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record