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dc.contributor.advisor Hinton, David
dc.contributor.author Li, Feifei
dc.date.accessioned 2012-04-26T17:31:34Z
dc.date.available 2012-04-26T17:31:34Z
dc.date.issued 2012-04-26
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/5246
dc.description.abstract Artificial food colors (AFCs) are dyes, pigments, or other substances that can impart color to either of a variety of foods making them attractive, appealing, appetizing, and informative. However, the AFCs have long been suspected of triggering attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Food Safety Authorization (EFSA) are responsible for assuring that citizens use the AFCs safely and appropriately. Since 1963, nine certified color additives have been approved for use in the United States, and 3 of the 9 were already banned in Europe. By comparing the AFCs legislation status in U.S. and E.U., and analyzing clinical data from academia, government and advocacy groups (NGOs), my review questions the use of AFCs in U.S. foods, and recommends that more epidemiology studies followed by carefully designed animal experiments should be done to determine whether these compounds are appropriate in food manufacturing. I recommend that the legislature move rapidly to enhance the reliability and safety of our food system. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.subject artificial food colors, clinical study, food safety, childhood hyperactivity, ADHD, food regulation en_US
dc.title A Critical Review on Childhood Hyperactivity and Artificial Food Colors en_US
dc.type Masters' project
dc.department Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences

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