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dc.contributor.advisor Richter, Daniel D.
dc.contributor.author Downey, Mark
dc.date.accessioned 2012-04-30T12:49:55Z
dc.date.available 2014-05-11T04:30:04Z
dc.date.issued 2012-04-30
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/5375
dc.description.abstract Agroforestry projects in Madagascar can address social and environmental threats from rainforest loss. This study aims to better align seedling production in agroforestry nurseries around Ranomafana N.P. with the planting preferences of local farmers. A social survey assessed current fruit cultivation and the fruit planting preferences of farmers, as well as differences in preferences based on distance to roads. Survey results from 200 households in 21 villages indicate current fruit cultivation does not correspond well with planting preferences. Households near and far from roads share similar cultivation patterns and planting preferences with one exception: farmers living far from roads prefer to plant coffee significantly more than do those living near roads. I attribute this preference for coffee cultivation far from roads to coffee’s high sales price and relative ease of transport to buyers. This study produced a rank-ordered list of fruit preferences to guide nursery priorities across the study area, though nursery managers are encouraged to focus on coffee for remote planting projects. en_US
dc.title TOWARD LASTING REFORESTATION: GUIDING PRODUCTION STRATEGIES IN AGROFORESTRY NURSERIES AROUND RANOMAFANA NATIONAL PARK, MADAGASCAR en_US
dc.type Masters' project
dc.department Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences
duke.embargo.months 24

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