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dc.contributor.advisor Aldrich, John H en_US
dc.contributor.author Sparks, David Bruce en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-05-25T20:21:00Z
dc.date.available 2014-05-15T04:30:05Z
dc.date.issued 2012 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/5587
dc.description Dissertation en_US
dc.description.abstract <p>I develop and justify a measure of polarization based on pairwise differences between and within groups, which improves on previous approaches in its ability to account for multiple dimensions and an arbitrary number of partitions. I apply this measure to a roll-call based ideological mapping of U.S. legislators to show that while the contemporary Congress is polarized relative to mid-century levels, the current state is not historically unprecedented.</p><p>I then estimate the ideology of public opinion using survey respondent thermometer evaluations of political elites and population subgroups. I find that party affiliation is polarizing in this space, but that alternate partitions of the electorate, along racial, educational, and other socio-demographic lines, are de-polarized.</p><p>Finally, I estimate a two-dimensional latent space based on social identity trait co-occurrence. I show that positions in this space are predictive of survey respondent ideology, partisanship, and voting behavior. Further, I show that when conceived in this way, we do observe a polarization of the social space over the last half-century of American politics.</p> en_US
dc.subject Political Science en_US
dc.subject heterogeneity en_US
dc.subject ideology en_US
dc.subject partisanship en_US
dc.subject polarization en_US
dc.title Ideological Segregation: Partisanship, Heterogeneity, and Polarization in the United States en_US
dc.type Dissertation en_US
dc.department Political Science en_US
duke.embargo.months 24 en_US

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