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dc.contributor.advisor Wells, Samuel en_US
dc.contributor.author Makant, Mindy en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-06-07T18:21:54Z
dc.date.available 2012-06-07T18:21:54Z
dc.date.issued 2012 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/5728
dc.description Dissertation en_US
dc.description.abstract <p>My subject is the redemption of profound suffering. I begin with the presumption that there is no suffering beyond the redemptive reach of God's grace. Drawing on insights from a number of academic disciplines, as well as on a wide variety of literary accounts of profound suffering, I consider the impact of the suffering of interpersonal violence on the formation of individual identity. I frame identity-formation in temporal terms, considering the impact of suffering in each temporal dimension: past, present, and future. In considering the past, I focus on the nature of memory, and argue that the memory of suffering resides in the body, soul, and mind, continually shaping the individual, and that a theological account of memory, therefore, cannot be reduced to cognitive recall. I also suggest that the integrity of the memory of suffering is often a casualty of suffering. In considering the present, I turn to an account of community which I argue is, likewise, an integral element of individual identity. I show the ways in which suffering, and the memory of suffering, continues to isolate those who have suffered. Next, I consider the future, and suggest that the anticipation of the future shapes both the memory of the past and the experience of the present. The memory of past suffering, I argue, threatens to obliterate the future in a way that can be devastating to present identity. I suggest that all three temporal dimensions are not only integral to identity but also embedded within one another. And I argue that, in light of the formative nature of suffering, the redemption of the individual necessarily includes the redemption of each temporal dimension. I suggest that there are specific ecclesial practices which develop habits of right vision, making this redemption evident such that the profound suffering of the past can be re-membered as a witness to God's redemption.</p> en_US
dc.subject Theology en_US
dc.subject Religion en_US
dc.subject Ethics en_US
dc.subject Community en_US
dc.subject Memory en_US
dc.subject Narrative en_US
dc.subject Redemption en_US
dc.subject Suffering en_US
dc.subject Witness en_US
dc.title Re-Membering Redemption: Bearing Witness to the Transformation of Suffering en_US
dc.type Dissertation en_US
dc.department Duke Divinity School en_US

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