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dc.contributor.advisor Wibbels, Erik en_US
dc.contributor.author Freeze, Kent en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-09-04T13:15:11Z
dc.date.available 2012-09-04T13:15:11Z
dc.date.issued 2012 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/5790
dc.description Dissertation en_US
dc.description.abstract <p>When do individuals feel that economic inequality needs to be corrected through redistributive government policy, such as progressive taxes or social spending? Using a cross-national data set of public opinion across both developing and developed countries, this dissertation finds that political context plays a key role in determining how individuals view economic inequality and their support for redistributive social policy. An overarching theme throughout the dissertation is that political elites are key in making inequality a prominent issue for the public. This is done by framing individual attributes such as income, ethnic identity or geographic local (urban vs. rural) in a way that will either maximize or minimize support for redistribution. When political elites lack incentives to mobilize public opinion on the issue, it becomes unlikely that individual attributes such as income or ethnicity will predict support for redistribution.</p> en_US
dc.subject Political Science en_US
dc.subject Inequality en_US
dc.subject Preferences en_US
dc.subject Redistribution en_US
dc.title Context and Preference Formation: The Social and Political Origins of Support for Redistribution en_US
dc.type Dissertation en_US
dc.department Political Science en_US

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