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dc.contributor.author Fuemmeler, BF
dc.contributor.author Østbye, T
dc.contributor.author Yang, C
dc.contributor.author McClernon, FJ
dc.contributor.author Kollins, SH
dc.coverage.spatial England
dc.date.accessioned 2012-10-23T20:22:57Z
dc.date.issued 2011-06
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20975727
dc.identifier ijo2010214
dc.identifier.citation Int J Obes (Lond), 2011, 35 (6), pp. 852 - 862
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/5916
dc.description.abstract OBJECTIVE: To examine the associations between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms, obesity and hypertension in young adults in a large population-based cohort. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The study population consisted of 15,197 respondents from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, a nationally representative sample of adolescents followed from 1995 to 2009 in the United States. Multinomial logistic and logistic models examined the odds of overweight, obesity and hypertension in adulthood in relation to retrospectively reported ADHD symptoms. Latent curve modeling was used to assess the association between symptoms and naturally occurring changes in body mass index (BMI) from adolescence to adulthood. RESULTS: Linear association was identified between the number of inattentive (IN) and hyperactive/impulsive (HI) symptoms and waist circumference, BMI, diastolic blood pressure and systolic blood pressure (all P-values for trend <0.05). Controlling for demographic variables, physical activity, alcohol use, smoking and depressive symptoms, those with three or more HI or IN symptoms had the highest odds of obesity (HI 3+, odds ratio (OR)=1.50, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.22-2.83; IN 3+, OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.02-1.44) compared with those with no HI or IN symptoms. HI symptoms at the 3+ level were significantly associated with a higher OR of hypertension (HI 3+, OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.01-1.51; HI continuous, OR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.00-1.09), but associations were nonsignificant when models were adjusted for BMI. Latent growth modeling results indicated that compared with those reporting no HI or IN symptoms, those reporting 3 or more symptoms had higher initial levels of BMI during adolescence. Only HI symptoms were associated with change in BMI. CONCLUSION: Self-reported ADHD symptoms were associated with adult BMI and change in BMI from adolescence to adulthood, providing further evidence of a link between ADHD symptoms and obesity.
dc.format.extent 852 - 862
dc.language ENG
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.relation.ispartof Int J Obes (Lond)
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1038/ijo.2010.214
dc.subject Adolescent
dc.subject Adult
dc.subject Age Factors
dc.subject Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
dc.subject Body Mass Index
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Hypertension
dc.subject Longitudinal Studies
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Obesity
dc.subject Odds Ratio
dc.subject Prevalence
dc.subject Risk Factors
dc.subject United States
dc.subject Young Adult
dc.title Association between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms and obesity and hypertension in early adulthood: a population-based study.
dc.type Journal Article
duke.description.endpage 862 en_US
duke.description.startpage 852 en_US
duke.description.volume 35 en_US
dc.relation.journal International Journal of Obesity en_US
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20975727
pubs.issue 6
pubs.organisational-group /Duke
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Institutes and Provost's Academic Units/University Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Institutes and Provost's Academic Units/University Institutes and Centers/Duke Institute for Brain Sciences
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Institutes and Provost's Academic Units/University Institutes and Centers/Global Health Institute
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Sanford School of Public Policy
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Sanford School of Public Policy/Center for Child and Family Policy
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/School of Medicine/Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/School of Medicine/Clinical Science Departments/Community and Family Medicine
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/School of Medicine/Clinical Science Departments/Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/School of Medicine/Clinical Science Departments/Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences/Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Addictions
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/School of Medicine/Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/School of Medicine/Institutes and Centers/Duke Cancer Institute
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/School of Medicine/Institutes and Centers/Duke Clinical Research Institute
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/School of Medicine/Institutes and Centers/Duke-UNC Center for Brain Imaging and Analysis
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/School of Nursing
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/School of Nursing/School of Nursing
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.organisational-group /Duke/Trinity College of Arts & Sciences/Psychology and Neuroscience
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 35
dc.identifier.eissn 1476-5497

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