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dc.contributor.advisor Wiener, Jonathan
dc.contributor.author McConville, Drew
dc.date.accessioned 2009-04-23T19:55:24Z
dc.date.available 2009-04-23T19:55:24Z
dc.date.issued 2009-04-23T19:55:24Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/967
dc.description.abstract Since climate change first emerged on the public agenda, many U.S. companies have made investments to reduce their greenhouse gas footprints. Opportunities also exist for deeper cuts in the near future. Consciously or not, the architects of future cap and trade legislation will build policy structures that reward or penalize these early emission reductions. This master’s project takes an in-depth look at the early action policies of three leading congressional proposals. It clarifies the trade-offs among policy alternatives and recommends an optimal policy on the basis of distributional equity, political support, economic and environmental impacts, and administrative feasibility. Policy recommendations also draw on lessons learned from the European Union’s greenhouse gas trading market and previous U.S. pollutant trading programs. en_US
dc.format.extent 1100183 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.subject Climate change en_US
dc.subject early action en_US
dc.subject global warming en_US
dc.subject legislation en_US
dc.subject early reductions en_US
dc.subject policy en_US
dc.title Treatment of early emission reductions by leading climate bills in the U.S. Congress en_US
dc.type Masters' project
dc.department Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences

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