Now showing items 1-5 of 5

    • A noisy linear map underlies oscillations in cell size and gene expression in bacteria. 

      Tanouchi, Yu; Pai, Anand; Park, Heungwon; Huang, Shuqiang; Stamatov, Rumen; Buchler, Nicolas E; You, Lingchong (Nature, 2015-07-16)
      During bacterial growth, a cell approximately doubles in size before division, after which it splits into two daughter cells. This process is subjected to the inherent perturbations of cellular noise and thus requires regulation ...
    • Oscillations by minimal bacterial suicide circuits reveal hidden facets of host-circuit physiology. 

      Marguet, Philippe; Tanouchi, Yu; Spitz, Eric; Smith, Cameron; You, Lingchong (PLoS One, 2010-07-30)
      Synthetic biology seeks to enable programmed control of cellular behavior though engineered biological systems. These systems typically consist of synthetic circuits that function inside, and interact with, complex host ...
    • Programming stress-induced altruistic death in engineered bacteria. 

      Tanouchi, Yu; Pai, Anand; Buchler, Nicolas E; You, Lingchong (Mol Syst Biol, 2012)
      Programmed death is often associated with a bacterial stress response. This behavior appears paradoxical, as it offers no benefit to the individual. This paradox can be explained if the death is 'altruistic': the killing ...
    • Stochastic E2F activation and reconciliation of phenomenological cell-cycle models. 

      Lee, Tae J; Yao, Guang; Bennett, Dorothy C; Nevins, Joseph R; You, Lingchong (PLoS Biol, 2010-09-21)
      The transition of the mammalian cell from quiescence to proliferation is a highly variable process. Over the last four decades, two lines of apparently contradictory, phenomenological models have been proposed to account ...
    • The inoculum effect and band-pass bacterial response to periodic antibiotic treatment. 

      Tan, Cheemeng; Smith, Robert Phillip; Srimani, Jaydeep K; Riccione, Katherine A; Prasada, Sameer; Kuehn, Meta; You, Lingchong (Mol Syst Biol, 2012)
      The inoculum effect (IE) refers to the decreasing efficacy of an antibiotic with increasing bacterial density. It represents a unique strategy of antibiotic tolerance and it can complicate design of effective antibiotic ...