Show simple item record

Autobiographical memories of anxiety-related experiences.

dc.contributor.author Pinna, K
dc.contributor.author Rubin, David C
dc.contributor.author Wenzel, Amy E
dc.coverage.spatial England
dc.date.accessioned 2015-05-20T02:21:22Z
dc.date.issued 2004-03
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14975773
dc.identifier S0005796703001426
dc.identifier.issn 0005-7967
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/10109
dc.description.abstract Ninety-nine undergraduate students retrieved three memories associated with each of the five emotional experiences: panic, trauma, worry, social anxiety, and feeling content. Subsequently, they answered 24 questions assessing properties of each memory, including the vividness and perceived accuracy of the memories and sensory, emotional, and anxiety-related experiences during retrieval. Memories were coded for affective tone and specificity. Results indicated that panic-related and trauma-related memories were rated similarly as content memories, but that they generally were associated with more imagery and emotional experiencing than worry-related or social anxiety-related memories. Participants experienced panic and worry symptoms to the greatest degree when they retrieved panic-related and trauma-related memories. All anxiety-related memories were characterized by more negative tone than content memories. Panic-related and trauma-related memories were more specific than worry-related, social anxiety-related, and content memories. These findings can explain partially why individuals with some, but not all, anxiety disorders experience enhanced memory for threatening material.
dc.language eng
dc.relation.ispartof Behav Res Ther
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1016/S0005-7967(03)00142-6
dc.subject Adult
dc.subject Affect
dc.subject Anxiety Disorders
dc.subject Eidetic Imagery
dc.subject Emotions
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Memory
dc.subject Mental Recall
dc.subject Perception
dc.title Autobiographical memories of anxiety-related experiences.
dc.type Journal article
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14975773
pubs.begin-page 329
pubs.end-page 341
pubs.issue 3
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Institute for Brain Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Psychology and Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.organisational-group University Institutes and Centers
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 42


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record