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Hostile attributional bias and aggressive behavior in global context.

dc.contributor.author Al-Hassan, SM
dc.contributor.author Alampay, LP
dc.contributor.author Bacchini, D
dc.contributor.author Bombi, AS
dc.contributor.author Bornstein, MH
dc.contributor.author Chang, L
dc.contributor.author Deater-Deckard, K
dc.contributor.author Di Giunta, L
dc.contributor.author Dodge, Kenneth A
dc.contributor.author Lansford, Jennifer E
dc.contributor.author Malone, Patrick S
dc.contributor.author Oburu, P
dc.contributor.author Pastorelli, C
dc.contributor.author Skinner, Ann T
dc.contributor.author Sorbring, E
dc.contributor.author Tapanya, S
dc.contributor.author Tirado, LM
dc.contributor.author Zelli, A
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2015-07-28T15:19:35Z
dc.date.issued 2015-07-28
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26170281
dc.identifier 1418572112
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/10328
dc.description.abstract We tested a model that children's tendency to attribute hostile intent to others in response to provocation is a key psychological process that statistically accounts for individual differences in reactive aggressive behavior and that this mechanism contributes to global group differences in children's chronic aggressive behavior problems. Participants were 1,299 children (mean age at year 1 = 8.3 y; 51% girls) from 12 diverse ecological-context groups in nine countries worldwide, followed across 4 y. In year 3, each child was presented with each of 10 hypothetical vignettes depicting an ambiguous provocation toward the child and was asked to attribute the likely intent of the provocateur (coded as benign or hostile) and to predict his or her own behavioral response (coded as nonaggression or reactive aggression). Mothers and children independently rated the child's chronic aggressive behavior problems in years 2, 3, and 4. In every ecological group, in those situations in which a child attributed hostile intent to a peer, that child was more likely to report that he or she would respond with reactive aggression than in situations when that same child attributed benign intent. Across children, hostile attributional bias scores predicted higher mother- and child-rated chronic aggressive behavior problems, even controlling for prior aggression. Ecological group differences in the tendency for children to attribute hostile intent statistically accounted for a significant portion of group differences in chronic aggressive behavior problems. The findings suggest a psychological mechanism for group differences in aggressive behavior and point to potential interventions to reduce aggressive behavior.
dc.language eng
dc.relation.ispartof Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1073/pnas.1418572112
dc.subject aggressive behavior
dc.subject cultural differences
dc.subject hostile attribution
dc.subject interpersonal conflict
dc.subject social cognition
dc.subject Aggression
dc.subject Child
dc.subject Child Behavior
dc.subject Child Behavior Disorders
dc.subject Conflict (Psychology)
dc.subject Cultural Characteristics
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Global Health
dc.subject Hostility
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Interpersonal Relations
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Models, Psychological
dc.subject Parents
dc.subject Peer Group
dc.subject Schools
dc.subject Social Perception
dc.subject Violence
dc.title Hostile attributional bias and aggressive behavior in global context.
dc.type Journal article
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26170281
pubs.begin-page 9310
pubs.end-page 9315
pubs.issue 30
pubs.organisational-group Center for Child and Family Policy
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Institute for Brain Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Duke Population Research Center
pubs.organisational-group Duke Population Research Institute
pubs.organisational-group Duke Science & Society
pubs.organisational-group Initiatives
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Psychology and Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Sanford School of Public Policy
pubs.organisational-group Staff
pubs.organisational-group Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.organisational-group University Institutes and Centers
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 112
dc.identifier.eissn 1091-6490


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