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Bioluminescence imaging of glucose in tissue surrounding polyurethane and glucose sensor implants.

dc.contributor.author Klitzman, Bruce
dc.contributor.author Prichard, HL
dc.contributor.author Reichert, WM
dc.contributor.author Schroeder, T
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2015-07-30T22:37:11Z
dc.date.issued 2010-09-01
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20920425
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/10337
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: The bioluminescence technique was used to quantify the local glucose concentration in the tissue surrounding subcutaneously implanted polyurethane material and surrounding glucose sensors. In addition, some implants were coated with a single layer of adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) because these cells improve the wound-healing response around biomaterials. METHODS: Control and ASC-coated implants were implanted subcutaneously in rats for 1 or 8 weeks (polyurethane) or for 1 week only (glucose sensors). Tissue biopsies adjacent to the implant were immediately frozen at the time of explant. Cryosections were assayed for glucose concentration profile using the bioluminescence technique. RESULTS: For the polyurethane samples, no significant differences in glucose concentration within 100 μm of the implant surface were found between bare and ASC-coated implants at 1 or 8 weeks. A glucose concentration gradient was demonstrated around the glucose sensors. For all sensors, the minimum glucose concentration of approximately 4 mM was found at the implant surface and increased with distance from the sensor surface until the glucose concentration peaked at approximately 7 mM at 100 μm. Then the glucose concentration decreased to 5.5-6.5 mM more than 100 μmm from the surface. CONCLUSIONS: The ASC attachment to polyurethane and to glucose sensors did not change the glucose profiles in the tissue surrounding the implants. Although most glucose sensors incorporate a diffusion barrier to reduce the gradient of glucose and oxygen in the tissue, it is typically assumed that there is no steep glucose gradient around the sensors. However, a glucose gradient was observed around the sensors. A more complete understanding of glucose transport and concentration gradients around sensors is critical.
dc.language eng
dc.relation.ispartof J Diabetes Sci Technol
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1177/193229681000400504
dc.subject Animals
dc.subject Biological Transport
dc.subject Biopsy
dc.subject Biosensing Techniques
dc.subject Glucose
dc.subject Implants, Experimental
dc.subject Luminescence
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Models, Animal
dc.subject Oxygen
dc.subject Polyurethanes
dc.subject Rats
dc.subject Rats, Inbred Lew
dc.subject Skin
dc.subject Stromal Cells
dc.title Bioluminescence imaging of glucose in tissue surrounding polyurethane and glucose sensor implants.
dc.type Journal article
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20920425
pubs.begin-page 1055
pubs.end-page 1062
pubs.issue 5
pubs.organisational-group Basic Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Biomedical Engineering
pubs.organisational-group Cell Biology
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Faculty
pubs.organisational-group Pratt School of Engineering
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Surgery
pubs.organisational-group Surgery, Plastic, Maxillofacial, and Oral Surgery
pubs.publication-status Published online
pubs.volume 4
dc.identifier.eissn 1932-2968


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