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The effect of nitric oxide surface flux on the foreign body response to subcutaneous implants.

dc.contributor.author Brown, NL
dc.contributor.author Klitzman, Bruce
dc.contributor.author Koh, A
dc.contributor.author Nichols, Scott P
dc.contributor.author Riccio, DA
dc.contributor.author Rose, MB
dc.contributor.author Schoenfisch, MH
dc.contributor.author Slomberg, DL
dc.contributor.author Sun, Bin
dc.coverage.spatial Netherlands
dc.date.accessioned 2015-07-30T22:54:53Z
dc.date.issued 2012-09
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22748919
dc.identifier S0142-9612(12)00594-7
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/10343
dc.description.abstract Although the release of nitric oxide (NO) from biomaterials has been shown to reduce the foreign body response (FBR), the optimal NO release kinetics and doses remain unknown. Herein, polyurethane-coated wire substrates with varying NO release properties were implanted into porcine subcutaneous tissue for 3, 7, 21 and 42 d. Histological analysis revealed that materials with short NO release durations (i.e., 24 h) were insufficient to reduce the collagen capsule thickness at 3 and 6 weeks, whereas implants with longer release durations (i.e., 3 and 14 d) and greater NO payloads significantly reduced the collagen encapsulation at both 3 and 6 weeks. The acute inflammatory response was mitigated most notably by systems with the longest duration and greatest dose of NO release, supporting the notion that these properties are most critical in circumventing the FBR for subcutaneous biomedical applications (e.g., glucose sensors).
dc.language eng
dc.relation.ispartof Biomaterials
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2012.05.053
dc.subject Animals
dc.subject Coated Materials, Biocompatible
dc.subject Collagen
dc.subject Foreign-Body Reaction
dc.subject Implants, Experimental
dc.subject Inflammation
dc.subject Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
dc.subject Nanoparticles
dc.subject Nitric Oxide
dc.subject Polyurethanes
dc.subject Subcutaneous Tissue
dc.subject Surface Properties
dc.subject Sus scrofa
dc.subject Water
dc.title The effect of nitric oxide surface flux on the foreign body response to subcutaneous implants.
dc.type Journal article
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22748919
pubs.begin-page 6305
pubs.end-page 6312
pubs.issue 27
pubs.organisational-group Basic Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Cell Biology
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Surgery
pubs.organisational-group Surgery, Plastic, Maxillofacial, and Oral Surgery
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 33
dc.identifier.eissn 1878-5905


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