Show simple item record

Improvement in visual search with practice: mapping learning-related changes in neurocognitive stages of processing.

dc.contributor.author Appelbaum, Lawrence Gregory
dc.contributor.author Clark, K
dc.contributor.author Mitroff, Stephen
dc.contributor.author van den Berg, Berry
dc.contributor.author Woldorff, Marty G
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2015-09-25T16:03:24Z
dc.date.issued 2015-04-01
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25834059
dc.identifier 35/13/5351
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/10641
dc.description.abstract Practice can improve performance on visual search tasks; the neural mechanisms underlying such improvements, however, are not clear. Response time typically shortens with practice, but which components of the stimulus-response processing chain facilitate this behavioral change? Improved search performance could result from enhancements in various cognitive processing stages, including (1) sensory processing, (2) attentional allocation, (3) target discrimination, (4) motor-response preparation, and/or (5) response execution. We measured event-related potentials (ERPs) as human participants completed a five-day visual-search protocol in which they reported the orientation of a color popout target within an array of ellipses. We assessed changes in behavioral performance and in ERP components associated with various stages of processing. After practice, response time decreased in all participants (while accuracy remained consistent), and electrophysiological measures revealed modulation of several ERP components. First, amplitudes of the early sensory-evoked N1 component at 150 ms increased bilaterally, indicating enhanced visual sensory processing of the array. Second, the negative-polarity posterior-contralateral component (N2pc, 170-250 ms) was earlier and larger, demonstrating enhanced attentional orienting. Third, the amplitude of the sustained posterior contralateral negativity component (SPCN, 300-400 ms) decreased, indicating facilitated target discrimination. Finally, faster motor-response preparation and execution were observed after practice, as indicated by latency changes in both the stimulus-locked and response-locked lateralized readiness potentials (LRPs). These electrophysiological results delineate the functional plasticity in key mechanisms underlying visual search with high temporal resolution and illustrate how practice influences various cognitive and neural processing stages leading to enhanced behavioral performance.
dc.language eng
dc.relation.ispartof J Neurosci
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1152-14.2015
dc.subject EEG
dc.subject LRP
dc.subject N2pc
dc.subject attention
dc.subject learning
dc.subject visual search
dc.subject Adolescent
dc.subject Adult
dc.subject Attention
dc.subject Brain
dc.subject Brain Mapping
dc.subject Brain Waves
dc.subject Discrimination (Psychology)
dc.subject Electroencephalography
dc.subject Evoked Potentials
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Learning
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Psychomotor Performance
dc.subject Reaction Time
dc.subject Visual Perception
dc.subject Young Adult
dc.title Improvement in visual search with practice: mapping learning-related changes in neurocognitive stages of processing.
dc.type Journal article
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25834059
pubs.begin-page 5351
pubs.end-page 5359
pubs.issue 13
pubs.organisational-group Basic Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Center for Cognitive Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Institute for Brain Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Duke Science & Society
pubs.organisational-group Duke-UNC Center for Brain Imaging and Analysis
pubs.organisational-group Initiatives
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Neurobiology
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Brain Stimulation and Neurophysiology
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Translational Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Psychology and Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.organisational-group University Institutes and Centers
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 35
dc.identifier.eissn 1529-2401


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record