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Contribution of bacterial outer membrane vesicles to innate bacterial defense.

dc.contributor.author Manning, Andrew J
dc.contributor.author Kuehn, Meta J
dc.coverage.spatial England
dc.date.accessioned 2015-10-05T18:41:37Z
dc.date.issued 2011-12-01
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22133164
dc.identifier 1471-2180-11-258
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/10657
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are constitutively produced by Gram-negative bacteria throughout growth and have proposed roles in virulence, inflammation, and the response to envelope stress. Here we investigate outer membrane vesiculation as a bacterial mechanism for immediate short-term protection against outer membrane acting stressors. Antimicrobial peptides as well as bacteriophage were used to examine the effectiveness of OMV protection. RESULTS: We found that a hyper-vesiculating mutant of Escherichia coli survived treatment by antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) polymyxin B and colistin better than the wild-type. Supplementation of E. coli cultures with purified outer membrane vesicles provided substantial protection against AMPs, and AMPs significantly induced vesiculation. Vesicle-mediated protection and induction of vesiculation were also observed for a human pathogen, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), challenged with polymyxin B. When ETEC with was incubated with low concentrations of vesicles concomitant with polymyxin B treatment, bacterial survival increased immediately, and the culture gained resistance to polymyxin B. By contrast, high levels of vesicles also provided immediate protection but prevented acquisition of resistance. Co-incubation of T4 bacteriophage and OMVs showed fast, irreversible binding. The efficiency of T4 infection was significantly reduced by the formation of complexes with the OMVs. CONCLUSIONS: These data reveal a role for OMVs in contributing to innate bacterial defense by adsorption of antimicrobial peptides and bacteriophage. Given the increase in vesiculation in response to the antimicrobial peptides, and loss in efficiency of infection with the T4-OMV complex, we conclude that OMV production may be an important factor in neutralizing environmental agents that target the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria.
dc.language eng
dc.publisher Springer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.relation.ispartof BMC Microbiol
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1186/1471-2180-11-258
dc.subject Bacteriophage T4
dc.subject Cell Membrane Structures
dc.subject Colistin
dc.subject Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli
dc.subject Microbial Viability
dc.subject Polymyxin B
dc.subject Virulence
dc.title Contribution of bacterial outer membrane vesicles to innate bacterial defense.
dc.type Journal article
duke.contributor.id Kuehn, Meta J|0199984
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22133164
pubs.begin-page 258
pubs.organisational-group Basic Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Biochemistry
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Cancer Institute
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group Molecular Genetics and Microbiology
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.publication-status Published online
pubs.volume 11
dc.identifier.eissn 1471-2180


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