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Dramatic variability of the carbonate system at a temperate coastal ocean site (Beaufort, North Carolina, USA) is regulated by physical and biogeochemical processes on multiple timescales.

dc.contributor.author Johnson, Zackary I
dc.contributor.author Wheeler, Benjamin J
dc.contributor.author Blinebry, Sara K
dc.contributor.author Carlson, Christina M
dc.contributor.author Ward, Christopher S
dc.contributor.author Hunt, Dana E
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2015-10-07T16:06:06Z
dc.date.issued 2013
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24358377
dc.identifier PONE-D-13-21826
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/10666
dc.description.abstract Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) from anthropogenic sources is acidifying marine environments resulting in potentially dramatic consequences for the physical, chemical and biological functioning of these ecosystems. If current trends continue, mean ocean pH is expected to decrease by ~0.2 units over the next ~50 years. Yet, there is also substantial temporal variability in pH and other carbon system parameters in the ocean resulting in regions that already experience change that exceeds long-term projected trends in pH. This points to short-term dynamics as an important layer of complexity on top of long-term trends. Thus, in order to predict future climate change impacts, there is a critical need to characterize the natural range and dynamics of the marine carbonate system and the mechanisms responsible for observed variability. Here, we present pH and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) at time intervals spanning 1 hour to >1 year from a dynamic, coastal, temperate marine system (Beaufort Inlet, Beaufort NC USA) to characterize the carbonate system at multiple time scales. Daily and seasonal variation of the carbonate system is largely driven by temperature, alkalinity and the balance between primary production and respiration, but high frequency change (hours to days) is further influenced by water mass movement (e.g. tides) and stochastic events (e.g. storms). Both annual (~0.3 units) and diurnal (~0.1 units) variability in coastal ocean acidity are similar in magnitude to 50 year projections of ocean acidity associated with increasing atmospheric CO2. The environmental variables driving these changes highlight the importance of characterizing the complete carbonate system rather than just pH. Short-term dynamics of ocean carbon parameters may already exert significant pressure on some coastal marine ecosystems with implications for ecology, biogeochemistry and evolution and this shorter term variability layers additive effects and complexity, including extreme values, on top of long-term trends in ocean acidification.
dc.language eng
dc.publisher Public Library of Science (PLoS)
dc.relation.ispartof PLoS One
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1371/journal.pone.0085117
dc.subject Carbonates
dc.subject Ecosystem
dc.subject Environment
dc.subject North Carolina
dc.subject Oceans and Seas
dc.title Dramatic variability of the carbonate system at a temperate coastal ocean site (Beaufort, North Carolina, USA) is regulated by physical and biogeochemical processes on multiple timescales.
dc.type Journal article
duke.contributor.id Johnson, Zackary I|0117006
duke.contributor.id Hunt, Dana E|0511612
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24358377
pubs.begin-page e85117
pubs.issue 12
pubs.organisational-group Biology
pubs.organisational-group Civil and Environmental Engineering
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Marine Science and Conservation
pubs.organisational-group Nicholas School of the Environment
pubs.organisational-group Pratt School of Engineering
pubs.organisational-group Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.publication-status Published online
pubs.volume 8
dc.identifier.eissn 1932-6203
duke.contributor.orcid Johnson, Zackary I|0000-0003-0793-8512


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