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Cortical β-amyloid levels and neurocognitive performance after cardiac surgery.

dc.contributor.author Doraiswamy, PM
dc.contributor.author James, OG
dc.contributor.author Klinger, RY
dc.contributor.author Mathew, Joseph P
dc.contributor.author Newman, Mark Franklin
dc.contributor.author Wong, TZ
dc.coverage.spatial England
dc.date.accessioned 2015-12-09T03:35:06Z
dc.date.issued 2013-09-20
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24056491
dc.identifier bmjopen-2013-003669
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/11134
dc.description.abstract INTRODUCTION: Neurological and neurocognitive dysfunction occurs frequently in the large number of increasingly elderly patients undergoing cardiac surgery every year. Perioperative cognitive deficits have been shown to persist after discharge and up to several years after surgery. More importantly, perioperative cognitive decline is predictive of long-term cognitive dysfunction, reduced quality of life and increased mortality. The proposed mechanisms to explain the cognitive decline associated with cardiac surgery include the neurotoxic accumulation of β-amyloid. This study will be the first to provide molecular imaging to assess the relationship between neocortical β-amyloid deposition and postoperative cognitive dysfunction. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: 40 patients providing informed consent for participation in this Institutional Review Board-approved study and undergoing cardiac (coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), valve or CABG+valve) surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass will be enrolled based on defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. At 6 weeks after surgery, participants will undergo (18)F-florbetapir positron emission tomography imaging to assess neocortical β-amyloid burden along with a standard neurocognitive battery and blood testing for apolipoprotein E ε-4 genotype. RESULTS: The results will be compared to those of 40 elderly controls and 40 elderly patients with mild cognitive impairment who have previously completed (18)F-florbetapir imaging. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study has been approved by the Duke University Institutional Review Board. The results will provide novel mechanistic insights into postoperative cognitive dysfunction that will inform future studies into potential treatments or preventative therapies of long-term cognitive decline after cardiac surgery.
dc.language eng
dc.relation.ispartof BMJ Open
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003669
dc.subject Amyloid
dc.subject Cardiopulomonary Bypass
dc.subject Cognition
dc.title Cortical β-amyloid levels and neurocognitive performance after cardiac surgery.
dc.type Journal article
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24056491
pubs.begin-page e003669
pubs.issue 9
pubs.organisational-group Anesthesiology
pubs.organisational-group Anesthesiology, Cardiothoracic
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Clinical Research Institute
pubs.organisational-group Duke Institute for Brain Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Duke Science & Society
pubs.organisational-group Initiatives
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Medicine, Cardiology
pubs.organisational-group Medicine, Geriatrics
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Translational Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Radiology
pubs.organisational-group Radiology, Nuclear Medicine
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group University Institutes and Centers
pubs.publication-status Published online
pubs.volume 3
dc.identifier.eissn 2044-6055


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