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Songbirds and the revised avian brain nomenclature.

dc.contributor.author Reiner, Anton
dc.contributor.author Perkel, David J
dc.contributor.author Mello, Claudio V
dc.contributor.author Jarvis, Erich D
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2015-12-19T14:30:33Z
dc.date.issued 2004-06
dc.identifier https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15313771
dc.identifier 1016/1/77
dc.identifier.issn 0077-8923
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/11231
dc.description.abstract It has become increasingly clear that the standard nomenclature for many telencephalic and related brainstem structures of the avian brain is based on flawed once-held assumptions of homology to mammalian brain structures, greatly hindering functional comparisons between avian and mammalian brains. This has become especially problematic for those researchers studying the neurobiology of birdsong, the largest single group within the avian neuroscience community. To deal with the many communication problems this has caused among researchers specializing in different vertebrate classes, the Avian Brain Nomenclature Forum, held at Duke University from July 18-20, 2002, set out to develop a new terminology for the avian telencephalon and some allied brainstem cell groups. In one major step, the erroneous conception that the avian telencephalon consists mainly of a hypertrophied basal ganglia has been purged from the telencephalic terminology, and the actual parts of the basal ganglia and its brainstem afferent cell groups have been given new names to reflect their now-evident homologies. The telencephalic regions that were incorrectly named to reflect presumed homology to mammalian basal ganglia have been renamed as parts of the pallium. The prefixes used for the new names for the pallial subdivisions have retained most established abbreviations, in an effort to maintain continuity with the pre-existing nomenclature. Here we present a brief synopsis of the inaccuracies in the old nomenclature, a summary of the nomenclature changes, and details of changes for specific songbird vocal and auditory nuclei. We believe this new terminology will promote more accurate understanding of the broader neurobiological implications of song control mechanisms and facilitate the productive exchange of information between researchers studying avian and mammalian systems.
dc.language eng
dc.publisher Wiley
dc.relation.ispartof Ann N Y Acad Sci
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1196/annals.1298.013
dc.subject Animals
dc.subject Auditory Pathways
dc.subject Brain
dc.subject Neural Pathways
dc.subject Songbirds
dc.subject Telencephalon
dc.subject Terminology as Topic
dc.subject Vocalization, Animal
dc.title Songbirds and the revised avian brain nomenclature.
dc.type Journal article
duke.contributor.id Jarvis, Erich D|0205264
pubs.author-url https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15313771
pubs.begin-page 77
pubs.end-page 108
pubs.organisational-group Basic Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Institute for Brain Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Neurobiology
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group University Institutes and Centers
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 1016


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