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The effect of the home environment on physical activity and dietary intake in preschool children.

dc.contributor.author Østbye, T
dc.contributor.author Malhotra, R
dc.contributor.author Stroo, M
dc.contributor.author Lovelady, C
dc.contributor.author Brouwer, R
dc.contributor.author Zucker, N
dc.contributor.author Fuemmeler, B
dc.coverage.spatial England
dc.date.accessioned 2016-01-05T14:11:24Z
dc.date.issued 2013-10
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23736357
dc.identifier ijo201376
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/11440
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: The effects of the home environment on child health behaviors related to obesity are unclear. PURPOSE: To examine the role of the home physical activity (PA) and food environment on corresponding outcomes in young children, and assess maternal education/work status as a moderator. METHODS: Overweight or obese mothers reported on the home PA and food environment (accessibility, role modeling and parental policies). Outcomes included child moderate-vigorous PA (MVPA) and sedentary time derived from accelerometer data and two dietary factors ('junk' and healthy food intake scores) based on factor analysis of mother-reported food intake. Linear regression models assessed the net effect (controlling for child demographics, study arm, supplemental time point, maternal education/work status, child body mass index and accelerometer wear time (for PA outcomes)) of the home environment on the outcomes and moderation by maternal education/work status. Data were collected in North Carolina from 2007 to 2011. RESULTS: Parental policies supporting PA increased MVPA time, and limiting access to unhealthy foods increased the healthy food intake score. Role modeling of healthy eating behaviors increased the healthy food intake score among children of mothers with no college education. Among children of mothers with no college education and not working, limiting access to unhealthy foods and role modeling reduced 'junk' food intake scores whereas parental policies supporting family meals increased 'junk' food intake scores. CONCLUSIONS: To promote MVPA, parental policies supporting child PA are warranted. Limited access to unhealthy foods and role modeling of healthy eating may improve the quality of the child's food intake.
dc.language eng
dc.publisher Springer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.relation.ispartof Int J Obes (Lond)
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1038/ijo.2013.76
dc.subject Adult
dc.subject Body Mass Index
dc.subject Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
dc.subject Child, Preschool
dc.subject Educational Status
dc.subject Employment
dc.subject Energy Intake
dc.subject Exercise
dc.subject Feeding Behavior
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Follow-Up Studies
dc.subject Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Mothers
dc.subject Obesity
dc.subject Parent-Child Relations
dc.subject Parenting
dc.subject Social Environment
dc.subject United States
dc.title The effect of the home environment on physical activity and dietary intake in preschool children.
dc.type Journal article
duke.contributor.id Brouwer, R|0268537
duke.contributor.id Zucker, N|0229588
duke.contributor.id Fuemmeler, B|0380453
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23736357
pubs.begin-page 1314
pubs.end-page 1321
pubs.issue 10
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Community and Family Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Cancer Institute
pubs.organisational-group Duke-UNC Center for Brain Imaging and Analysis
pubs.organisational-group Global Health Institute
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry, Child & Family Mental Health and Developmental Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Psychology and Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group School of Nursing
pubs.organisational-group School of Nursing - Secondary Group
pubs.organisational-group Staff
pubs.organisational-group Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.organisational-group University Institutes and Centers
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 37
dc.identifier.eissn 1476-5497


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