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Metabolic profiling in Prader-Willi syndrome and nonsyndromic obesity: Sex differences and the role of growth hormone

dc.contributor.author Bain, James R
dc.contributor.author Butler, MG
dc.contributor.author Freemark, Michael Scott
dc.contributor.author Haqq, AM
dc.contributor.author Ilkayeva, Olga
dc.contributor.author Irizarry, Krystal Andrea
dc.contributor.author Muehlbauer, Michael J
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-15T16:23:04Z
dc.date.issued 2015-12-01
dc.identifier.issn 0300-0664
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/11607
dc.description.abstract © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.Objectives To identify metabolic factors controlling appetite and insulin sensitivity in PWS and assess effects of GH treatment. Methods We compared amino acids, fatty acids and acylcarnitines in GH-treated and untreated PWS children and obese and lean controls to identify biomarkers associated with ghrelin, peptide YY and markers of insulin sensitivity (adiponectin and HOMA-IR). Results Compared with obese controls (OC), children with PWS had fasting hyperghrelinaemia, hyperadiponectinaemia, hypoinsulinaemia and increased ghrelin/PYY. Hyperghrelinaemia, hyperadiponectinaemia and hypoinsulinaemia were more striking in PWS females than males, and decreases in BCAA were detected only in PWS females. GH-treated PWS subjects had lower leptin and higher IGF-1 and adiponectin than untreated subjects; fasting ghrelin, PYY and insulin levels were comparable. Ghrelin correlated inversely with BCAA in PWS but not OC. Adiponectin correlated negatively with BMIz and HOMA-IR in PWS; in contrast, adiponectin correlated more strongly with BCAA than BMIz or HOMA-IR in OC. Conclusions BCAA levels were lower in PWS females than OC females and correlated inversely with ghrelin. Low BCAA in PWS females may promote hyperghrelinaemia and hyperphagia, while hyperadiponectinaemia may maintain insulin sensitivity despite excess weight gain. GH treatment may reduce leptin and increase adiponectin, but does not affect fasting ghrelin or PYY.
dc.relation.ispartof Clinical Endocrinology
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1111/cen.12766
dc.title Metabolic profiling in Prader-Willi syndrome and nonsyndromic obesity: Sex differences and the role of growth hormone
dc.type Journal article
pubs.begin-page 797
pubs.end-page 805
pubs.issue 6
pubs.organisational-group Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Molecular Physiology Institute
pubs.organisational-group Global Health Institute
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Medicine, Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Nutrition
pubs.organisational-group Pediatrics
pubs.organisational-group Pediatrics, Endocrinology
pubs.organisational-group Sarah Stedman Nutrition & Metabolism Center
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group University Institutes and Centers
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 83
dc.identifier.eissn 1365-2265


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