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Visual perception and corollary discharge.

dc.contributor.author Sommer, Marc A
dc.contributor.author Wurtz, Robert H
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2016-03-25T02:34:45Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18491718
dc.identifier.issn 0301-0066
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/11731
dc.description.abstract Perception depends not only on sensory input but also on the state of the brain receiving that input. A classic example is perception of a stable visual world in spite of the saccadic eye movements that shift the images on the retina. A long-standing hypothesis is that the brain compensates for the disruption of visual input by using advance knowledge of the impending saccade, an internally generated corollary discharge. One possible neuronal mechanism for this compensation has been previously identified in parietal and frontal cortex of monkeys, but the origin of the necessary corollary discharge remained unknown. Here, we consider recent experiments that identified a pathway for a corollary discharge for saccades that extends from the superior colliculus in the midbrain to the frontal eye fields in the cerebral cortex with a relay in the medial dorsal nucleus of the thalamus. We first review the nature of the evidence used to identify a corollary discharge signal in the complexity of the primate brain and show its use for guiding a rapid sequence of eye movements. We then consider two experiments that show this same corollary signal may provide the input to the frontal cortex neurons that alters their activity with saccades in ways that could compensate for the displacements in the visual input produced by saccadic eye movements. The first experiment shows that the corollary discharge signal is spatially and temporally appropriate to produce the alterations in the frontal-cortex neurons. The second shows that this signal is necessary for this alteration because inactivation of the corollary reduces the compensation by frontal-cortex neurons. The identification of this relatively simple circuit specifies the organization of a corollary discharge in the primate brain for the first time and provides a specific example upon which consideration of the roles of corollary activity in other systems and for other functions can be evaluated.
dc.language eng
dc.publisher SAGE Publications
dc.relation.ispartof Perception
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1068/p5873
dc.subject Animals
dc.subject Brain Mapping
dc.subject Frontal Lobe
dc.subject Macaca mulatta
dc.subject Mediodorsal Thalamic Nucleus
dc.subject Neurons
dc.subject Parietal Lobe
dc.subject Photic Stimulation
dc.subject Reaction Time
dc.subject Saccades
dc.subject Thalamus
dc.subject Visual Pathways
dc.subject Visual Perception
dc.title Visual perception and corollary discharge.
dc.type Journal article
duke.contributor.id Sommer, Marc A|0522637
pubs.author-url https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18491718
pubs.begin-page 408
pubs.end-page 418
pubs.issue 3
pubs.organisational-group Basic Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Biomedical Engineering
pubs.organisational-group Center for Cognitive Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Institute for Brain Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Neurobiology
pubs.organisational-group Pratt School of Engineering
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group University Institutes and Centers
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 37
duke.contributor.orcid Sommer, Marc A|0000-0001-5061-763X


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