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Cortical Brain Activity Reflecting Attentional Biasing Toward Reward-Predicting Cues Covaries with Economic Decision-Making Performance.

dc.contributor.author San Martín, René
dc.contributor.author Appelbaum, Lawrence G
dc.contributor.author Huettel, Scott A
dc.contributor.author Woldorff, Marty G
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2016-05-11T20:02:56Z
dc.date.issued 2016-01
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25139941
dc.identifier bhu160
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/12006
dc.description.abstract Adaptive choice behavior depends critically on identifying and learning from outcome-predicting cues. We hypothesized that attention may be preferentially directed toward certain outcome-predicting cues. We studied this possibility by analyzing event-related potential (ERP) responses in humans during a probabilistic decision-making task. Participants viewed pairs of outcome-predicting visual cues and then chose to wager either a small (i.e., loss-minimizing) or large (i.e., gain-maximizing) amount of money. The cues were bilaterally presented, which allowed us to extract the relative neural responses to each cue by using a contralateral-versus-ipsilateral ERP contrast. We found an early lateralized ERP response, whose features matched the attention-shift-related N2pc component and whose amplitude scaled with the learned reward-predicting value of the cues as predicted by an attention-for-reward model. Consistently, we found a double dissociation involving the N2pc. Across participants, gain-maximization positively correlated with the N2pc amplitude to the most reliable gain-predicting cue, suggesting an attentional bias toward such cues. Conversely, loss-minimization was negatively correlated with the N2pc amplitude to the most reliable loss-predicting cue, suggesting an attentional avoidance toward such stimuli. These results indicate that learned stimulus-reward associations can influence rapid attention allocation, and that differences in this process are associated with individual differences in economic decision-making performance.
dc.language eng
dc.publisher Oxford University Press (OUP)
dc.relation.ispartof Cereb Cortex
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1093/cercor/bhu160
dc.subject EEG
dc.subject ERP
dc.subject N2pc
dc.subject learning
dc.subject reward
dc.subject Adolescent
dc.subject Adult
dc.subject Attention
dc.subject Brain
dc.subject Brain Mapping
dc.subject Cues
dc.subject Decision Making
dc.subject Evoked Potentials
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Photic Stimulation
dc.subject Reaction Time
dc.subject Reward
dc.subject Space Perception
dc.subject Visual Perception
dc.subject Young Adult
dc.title Cortical Brain Activity Reflecting Attentional Biasing Toward Reward-Predicting Cues Covaries with Economic Decision-Making Performance.
dc.type Journal article
duke.contributor.id Appelbaum, Lawrence G|0402801
duke.contributor.id Huettel, Scott A|0115750
duke.contributor.id Woldorff, Marty G|0234258
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25139941
pubs.begin-page 1
pubs.end-page 11
pubs.issue 1
pubs.organisational-group Basic Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Center for Child and Family Policy
pubs.organisational-group Center for Cognitive Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Center for Population Health & Aging
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Institute for Brain Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Duke Population Research Center
pubs.organisational-group Duke Population Research Institute
pubs.organisational-group Duke Science & Society
pubs.organisational-group Duke-UNC Center for Brain Imaging and Analysis
pubs.organisational-group Initiatives
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Neurobiology
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Brain Stimulation and Neurophysiology
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Translational Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Psychology and Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Sanford School of Public Policy
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.organisational-group University Institutes and Centers
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 26
dc.identifier.eissn 1460-2199
duke.contributor.orcid Appelbaum, Lawrence G|0000-0002-3184-6725
duke.contributor.orcid Huettel, Scott A|0000-0002-5092-4936
duke.contributor.orcid Woldorff, Marty G|0000-0002-2683-4551


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