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The dynamics of proactive and reactive cognitive control processes in the human brain.

dc.contributor.author Appelbaum, Lawrence Gregory
dc.contributor.author Boehler, CN
dc.contributor.author Davis, LA
dc.contributor.author Woldorff, Marty G
dc.contributor.author Won, RJ
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2016-05-11T20:04:47Z
dc.date.issued 2014-05
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24345171
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/12008
dc.description.abstract In this study, we leveraged the high temporal resolution of EEG to examine the neural mechanisms underlying the flexible regulation of cognitive control that unfolds over different timescales. We measured behavioral and neural effects of color-word incongruency, as different groups of participants performed three different versions of color-word Stroop tasks in which the relative timing of the color and word features varied from trial to trial. For this purpose, we used a standard Stroop color identification task with equal congruent-to-incongruent proportions (50%/50%), along with two versions of the "Reverse Stroop" word identification tasks, for which we manipulated the incongruency proportion (50%/50% and 80%/20%). Two canonical ERP markers of neural processing of stimulus incongruency, the frontocentral negative polarity incongruency wave (NINC) and the late positive component (LPC), were evoked across the various conditions. Results indicated that color-word incongruency interacted with the relative feature timing, producing greater neural and behavioral effects when the task-irrelevant stimulus preceded the target, but still significant effects when it followed. Additionally, both behavioral and neural incongruency effects were reduced by nearly half in the word identification task (Reverse Stroop 50/50) relative to the color identification task (Stroop 50/50), with these effects essentially fully recovering when incongruent trials appeared only infrequently (Reverse Stroop 80/20). Across the conditions, NINC amplitudes closely paralleled RTs, indicating this component is sensitive to the overall level of stimulus conflict. In contrast, LPC amplitudes were largest with infrequent incongruent trials, suggesting a possible readjustment role when proactive control is reduced. These findings thus unveil distinct control mechanisms that unfold over time in response to conflicting stimulus input under different contexts.
dc.language eng
dc.relation.ispartof J Cogn Neurosci
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1162/jocn_a_00542
dc.subject Adolescent
dc.subject Adult
dc.subject Brain
dc.subject Cognition
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Photic Stimulation
dc.subject Psychomotor Performance
dc.subject Reaction Time
dc.subject Young Adult
dc.title The dynamics of proactive and reactive cognitive control processes in the human brain.
dc.type Journal article
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24345171
pubs.begin-page 1021
pubs.end-page 1038
pubs.issue 5
pubs.organisational-group Basic Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Center for Cognitive Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Institute for Brain Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Duke Science & Society
pubs.organisational-group Duke-UNC Center for Brain Imaging and Analysis
pubs.organisational-group Initiatives
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Neurobiology
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Brain Stimulation and Neurophysiology
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Translational Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Psychology and Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.organisational-group University Institutes and Centers
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 26
dc.identifier.eissn 1530-8898


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