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The neural basis of involuntary episodic memories.

dc.contributor.author Berntsen, D
dc.contributor.author Cabeza, Roberto
dc.contributor.author Davis, Simon Wilton
dc.contributor.author Hall, SA
dc.contributor.author Miles, A
dc.contributor.author Rubin, David C
dc.contributor.author Wing, EA
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2016-05-15T16:04:23Z
dc.date.issued 2014-10
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24702453
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/12027
dc.description.abstract Voluntary episodic memories require an intentional memory search, whereas involuntary episodic memories come to mind spontaneously without conscious effort. Cognitive neuroscience has largely focused on voluntary memory, leaving the neural mechanisms of involuntary memory largely unknown. We hypothesized that, because the main difference between voluntary and involuntary memory is the controlled retrieval processes required by the former, there would be greater frontal activity for voluntary than involuntary memories. Conversely, we predicted that other components of the episodic retrieval network would be similarly engaged in the two types of memory. During encoding, all participants heard sounds, half paired with pictures of complex scenes and half presented alone. During retrieval, paired and unpaired sounds were presented, panned to the left or to the right. Participants in the involuntary group were instructed to indicate the spatial location of the sound, whereas participants in the voluntary group were asked to additionally recall the pictures that had been paired with the sounds. All participants reported the incidence of their memories in a postscan session. Consistent with our predictions, voluntary memories elicited greater activity in dorsal frontal regions than involuntary memories, whereas other components of the retrieval network, including medial-temporal, ventral occipitotemporal, and ventral parietal regions were similarly engaged by both types of memories. These results clarify the distinct role of dorsal frontal and ventral occipitotemporal regions in predicting strategic retrieval and recalled information, respectively, and suggest that, although there are neural differences in retrieval, involuntary memories share neural components with established voluntary memory systems.
dc.language eng
dc.relation.ispartof J Cogn Neurosci
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1162/jocn_a_00633
dc.subject Acoustic Stimulation
dc.subject Adolescent
dc.subject Adult
dc.subject Association Learning
dc.subject Brain
dc.subject Brain Mapping
dc.subject Cues
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Functional Laterality
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
dc.subject Magnetic Resonance Imaging
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Memory, Episodic
dc.subject Mental Recall
dc.subject Oxygen
dc.subject Young Adult
dc.title The neural basis of involuntary episodic memories.
dc.type Journal article
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24702453
pubs.begin-page 2385
pubs.end-page 2399
pubs.issue 10
pubs.organisational-group Center for Cognitive Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Center for Population Health & Aging
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Institute for Brain Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Duke Population Research Institute
pubs.organisational-group Duke Science & Society
pubs.organisational-group Duke-UNC Center for Brain Imaging and Analysis
pubs.organisational-group Initiatives
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Neurology
pubs.organisational-group Neurology, Behavioral Neurology
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Geriatric Behavioral Health
pubs.organisational-group Psychology and Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Sanford School of Public Policy
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.organisational-group University Institutes and Centers
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 26
dc.identifier.eissn 1530-8898


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