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Mothers but not wives: The increasing lag between nonmarital births and marriage

dc.contributor.author Gibson Davis, CM
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-07T18:11:36Z
dc.date.issued 2011-02-01
dc.identifier.issn 0022-2445
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/12437
dc.description.abstract This study analyzed trends in marital behavior for unwed mothers who gave birth between 1960 and 2004. With nationally representative data on 15,353 White and Black unmarried mothers, results indicated that mothers who gave birth after 1989 were waiting much longer to marry than were mothers giving birth before 1968. The most pronounced delays were found immediately after a birth. Over the study period, the cumulative proportion of women who married within three years of a birth decreased for Whites by 27% and for Blacks by 60%. Findings underscore the separation that has developed between first births and first marriages in the United States, and they highlight the older ages at which children are experiencing a transition to marriage. © National Council on Family Relations, 2011.
dc.relation.ispartof Journal of Marriage and Family
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1111/j.1741-3737.2010.00803.x
dc.title Mothers but not wives: The increasing lag between nonmarital births and marriage
dc.type Journal article
pubs.begin-page 264
pubs.end-page 278
pubs.issue 1
pubs.organisational-group Center for Child and Family Policy
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Population Research Center
pubs.organisational-group Duke Population Research Institute
pubs.organisational-group Psychology and Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Sanford School of Public Policy
pubs.organisational-group Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 73
dc.identifier.eissn 1741-3737


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