Show simple item record

Development and Refinement of a Learning Health Systems Training Program.

dc.contributor.author Abernethy, Amy Pickar
dc.contributor.author Cameron, Blake
dc.contributor.author Howie, L
dc.contributor.author Patel, Krish
dc.contributor.author Roe, Laura
dc.contributor.author Samsa, Gregory P
dc.contributor.author Wysham, NG
dc.contributor.author Zaas, Aimee Kirsch
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2016-11-22T17:07:37Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28154832
dc.identifier egems1236
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/13017
dc.description.abstract CONTEXT: In the emerging Learning Health System (LHS), the application and generation of medical knowledge are a natural outgrowth of patient care. Achieving this ideal requires a physician workforce adept in information systems, quality improvement methods, and systems-based practice to be able to use existing data to inform future care. These skills are not currently taught in medical school or graduate medical education. CASE DESCRIPTION: We initiated a first-ever Learning Health Systems Training Program (LHSTP) for resident physicians. The curriculum builds analytical, informatics and systems engineering skills through an active-learning project utilizing health system data that culminates in a final presentation to health system leadership. FINDINGS: LHSTP has been in place for two years, with 14 participants from multiple medical disciplines. Challenges included scheduling, mentoring, data standardization, and iterative optimization of the curriculum for real-time instruction. Satisfaction surveys and feedback were solicited mid-year in year 2. Most respondents were satisfied with the program, and several participants wished to continue in the program in various capacities after their official completion. MAJOR THEMES: We adapted our curriculum to successes and challenges encountered in the first two years. Modifications include a revised approach to teaching statistics, smaller cohorts, and more intensive mentorship. We continue to explore ways for our graduates to remain involved in the LHSTP and to disseminate this program to other institutions. CONCLUSION: The LHSTP is a novel curriculum that trains physicians to lead towards the LHS. Successful methods have included diverse multidisciplinary educators, just in time instruction, tailored content, and mentored projects with local health system impact.
dc.language eng
dc.relation.ispartof EGEMS (Wash DC)
dc.relation.isversionof 10.13063/2327-9214.1236
dc.subject Data Use and Quality
dc.subject Electronic Health Record
dc.subject Learning Health System
dc.subject Provider Education
dc.subject Quality Improvement
dc.title Development and Refinement of a Learning Health Systems Training Program.
dc.type Journal article
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28154832
pubs.begin-page 1236
pubs.issue 1
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Medicine, Nephrology
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.publication-status Published online
pubs.volume 4


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record