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Game Theory and Cold War Rationality: A Review Essay

dc.contributor.author Weintraub, E Roy
dc.date.accessioned 2016-12-06T18:48:48Z
dc.date.issued 2016-02-23
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/13214
dc.description.abstract This essay reviews new histories of the role of game theory and rational decision-making in shaping the social sciences, economics among them, in the post war period. The recent books "The World the Game Theorists Made" by Paul Erickson and "How Reason Almost Lost Its Mind" by Paul Erickson, Judy Klein, Lorraine Daston, Rebecca Lemov, Thomas Sturm, and Michael Gordin raise a number of complex historical questions about the interconnections among game theory, utility theory, decision-theory, optimization theory, information theory and theories of rational choice. Moreover the contingencies of time, place, and person call into question the usefulness of economists' linear narratives about the autonomous and progressive development of modern economics. The essay finally reflects on the challenges that these issues present for historians of recent economics.
dc.format.extent 32 pages
dc.relation.ispartof Economic Research Initiatives at Duke (ERID)
dc.subject game theory
dc.subject rational choice
dc.subject programming
dc.subject rationality
dc.subject RAND
dc.subject John von Neumann
dc.subject Cold War
dc.subject operations reserach
dc.title Game Theory and Cold War Rationality: A Review Essay
dc.type Journal article
pubs.issue 208
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Economics
pubs.organisational-group Trinity College of Arts & Sciences


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