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A wirelessly controlled implantable LED system for deep brain optogenetic stimulation.

dc.contributor.author Fu, Quanhai
dc.contributor.author Go, V
dc.contributor.author Morizio, James
dc.contributor.author Murphy, T
dc.contributor.author Rossi, M
dc.contributor.author Yin, Henry
dc.coverage.spatial Switzerland
dc.date.accessioned 2017-01-05T15:43:51Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25713516
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10161/13450
dc.description.abstract In recent years optogenetics has rapidly become an essential technique in neuroscience. Its temporal and spatial specificity, combined with efficacy in manipulating neuronal activity, are especially useful in studying the behavior of awake behaving animals. Conventional optogenetics, however, requires the use of lasers and optic fibers, which can place considerable restrictions on behavior. Here we combined a wirelessly controlled interface and small implantable light-emitting diode (LED) that allows flexible and precise placement of light source to illuminate any brain area. We tested this wireless LED system in vivo, in transgenic mice expressing channelrhodopsin-2 in striatonigral neurons expressing D1-like dopamine receptors. In all mice tested, we were able to elicit movements reliably. The frequency of twitches induced by high power stimulation is proportional to the frequency of stimulation. At lower power, contraversive turning was observed. Moreover, the implanted LED remains effective over 50 days after surgery, demonstrating the long-term stability of the light source. Our results show that the wireless LED system can be used to manipulate neural activity chronically in behaving mice without impeding natural movements.
dc.language eng
dc.relation.ispartof Front Integr Neurosci
dc.relation.isversionof 10.3389/fnint.2015.00008
dc.subject channelrhodopsin
dc.subject direct pathway
dc.subject freely-behaving
dc.subject optogenetics
dc.subject striatonigral
dc.subject wireless
dc.title A wirelessly controlled implantable LED system for deep brain optogenetic stimulation.
dc.type Journal article
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25713516
pubs.begin-page 8
pubs.organisational-group Basic Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Institute for Brain Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Electrical and Computer Engineering
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Provost's Academic Units
pubs.organisational-group Neurobiology
pubs.organisational-group Pratt School of Engineering
pubs.organisational-group Psychology and Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.organisational-group University Institutes and Centers
pubs.publication-status Published online
pubs.volume 9


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